News

Balantekin Elected Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board for the European Centre for Theoretical Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT*)
Thursday, October 18, 2012
Baha Balantekin, Eugene P. Wigner Professor of Physics, has been elected as the Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board for the European Centre for Theoretical Nuclear Physics and Related Areas (ECT*) at Trento, Italy. This Centre aims to facilitate in-depth research on topical problems at the forefront of contemporary developments in theoretical nuclear physics and related areas such as particle physics, astrophysics, and condensed-matter physics by arranging workshops and collaboration meetings. It also contributes to the training of next generation of theorists through several programs aimed at the graduate students. It is supported by the member states of the European Union. Chairs of the ECT* Advisory Board are usually elected from a group of prominent theoretical physicists at the European universities and laboratories. Balantekin is the first chair of ECT* employed by a U.S. institution. He starts his duties in November 2012.

Search for the Higgs Boson
Thursday, July 5, 2012
The ATLAS and CMS experiments observe an excess in their data from a new particle consistent with the production of a Higgs Boson. They will need the additional data planned from the running of the LHC until next year to establish if this is indeed the Higgs Boson and that we stand at the threshold of a new era of understanding the origins of mass. Physics Faculty involved: Wu (ATLAS), Smith (CMS), Pan (ATLAS), Mellado (ATLAS), Herndon (CMS), Dasu (CMS) & Carlsmith (CMS) For more information see:

2012 Department of Physics Awards Banquet
Friday, May 4, 2012
The 2012 Department of Physics Award Banquet was held Friday, May 4 at the Fluno Center. Photographs, award winners, and more are located on the website. For more information see the links below.

Observation of Electron Antineutrino Disappearance at Daya Bay
Thursday, March 8, 2012
The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, a multinational collaboration operating in the south of China, today reported the first results of its search for the last, most elusive piece of a long-standing puzzle: how is it that neutrinos can appear to vanish as they travel?

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