This Week at Physics

 
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This Week at Physics

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Events on Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

Chaos & Complex Systems Seminar
Functional integration and split in the brain
Time: 12:05 pm
Place: 4274 Chamberlin (refreshments will be served)
Speaker: Shun Sasai, UW Department of Psychiatry
Abstract: We often engage in two concurrent but unrelated activities, such as driving on a quiet road while talking over the phone. When the conversation is unrelated to driving, how does the brain manage these two concurrent flows? I will present our recent work showing that a brain may functionally split into two separate 'driving' and 'listening' systems when a listening task is unrelated to concurrent driving, but not when the two tasks are related.
Host: Clint Sprott
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"Physics Today" Undergrad Colloquium (Physics 301)
Direct Dark Matter Detection and LZ
Time: 1:20 pm
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Kimberly J. Palladino, UW Madison Department of Physics
Host: Wesley Smith
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NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum
Studying Neutrino Oscillations at NOvA: From Experimental Design to Pioneering Analysis
Time: 4:00 pm
Place: 4274 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Alexander Radovic, William and Mary
Abstract: The observation of neutrino oscillations provides evidence of physics beyond the standard model, and the precise measurement of those oscillations remains an important goal for the field of particle physics. NOνA is one of the foremost experiments in that field. Taking advantage of a two-detector technique, a tightly focused off-axis view of the NuMI neutrino beam, and a pair of finely instrumented liquid scintillator detectors, NOνA is in a prime position to contribute to precision measurements of the neutrino mass splitting, mass hierarchy, and CP violation.

This presentation will describe the goals and design of the NOνA experiment, and outline how the cutting edge tools of the Deep Learning community are being used to push the limits of that design. The latest oscillation results will be shown, along with a guide to what to expect from NOvA in the coming years.
Host: Sridhara Dasu
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