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Events on Monday, February 26th, 2018

Council Meeting
Council Meeting
Time: 12:00 am
Place: 2314 Chamberlin Hall
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Plasma Physics (Physics/ECE/NE 922) Seminar
Materials for Fusion from Challenge to Realization
Time: 12:05 pm
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Dr. Jan Coenen, Forschungszentrum Julich
Abstract: Tungsten (W) is currently the main candidate material for the first wall and in particular for highly loaded components of the diverter of a reactor as it is resilient against erosion, has the highest melting point, shows benign behavior under neutron irradiation, and low tritium retention. Extensive work has been done to qualify current materials with respect to these issues for ITER, especially for W as first wall and diverter material. Melting is one of the major risks associated with Tungsten as A PFC. It was shown during multiple experiments that deep W melting can cause severe damage to components. Experiments were performed to assess how transient (ms-duration / μ m depth) melting during ELMs (Edge Localized Modes) might affect the operation of JET and ITER. The impact and physics of melting was studied in a relevant environment. It was established that melting and power-handling of tungsten components is well understood, however as consequence of the experiments special shaping, to mitigate the heat flux to the exposed surfaces and edged, will have to be applied. For the next step devices, e.g. DEMO, or a future fusion reactor the limits on power exhaust, availability and lifetime are even more stringent. It was established that the boundary conditions to be fulfilled for the materials are in many cases above the technical feasibility limits as they are understood today. DEMO is presently considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to produce electricity and is viewed in Europe as a single step between ITER and a commercial power plant. Efforts to establish new advanced plasma- facing material-options are moving forward focusing on crack resilient materials with low activation, minimal tritium uptake, long lifetime and low erosion. Many of these materials base their advanced properties on the use of a composite approach. With the incorporation of fibers, energy dissipating mechanisms, like ductile deformation of fibers, fiber pull-out, and crack bridging and deflection are facilitated. Development and testing of new materials under relevant conditions needs to be performed extensively to have components ready in time for the next step devices. In summary it should be understood that both sides, plasma physics as well as materials science and engineering have their role to play in making fusion a viable energy technology of the future.
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NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum
tbd
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 4274 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Daniel Cherdack, Colorado State University
Abstract: tbconfirmed
Host: Sridhara Dasu
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