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Events on Monday, February 18th, 2019

Plasma Physics (Physics/ECE/NE 922) Seminar
Energetic Particle Physics in the 3D Reversed-Field Pinch
Time: 12:05 pm
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Philip Bonofiglo, UW-Madison
Abstract: The examination of fast ion behavior in 3D magnetic fields is of growing importance in fusion scenarios. In addition to applied 3D perturbations in the tokamak and the inherently 3D stellarator equilibrium, the RFP possesses the unique ability to spontaneously change from a 2D-axisymmetric equilibrium to a 3D-helical equilibrium known as quasi-single helicity. A helical axis forms when the innermost resonant tearing mode grows to an amplitude large enough to envelop the magnetic axis while the subdominant modes decrease in amplitude. The helical core results in a local reduction of the tearing-mode induced magnetic stochasticity characteristic of the standard RFP. Prior studies have shown that a strong thermal transport barrier develops. This work presents the first comprehensive study of fast ion behavior in this state. An investigation of fast ion transport due to energetic particle-driven Alfvénic instabilities, tearing-mode induced stochasticity, and neoclassical effects will be discussed.
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Physics Department Colloquium
Please note special date/time
Quantum Diamond Sensors
Time: 4:30 pm
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Ron Walsworth, Harvard
Abstract: In recent years, optically probed nitrogen–vacancy (NV) quantum defects in diamond have become a leading modality for magnetic, electrical, and temperature sensing at short length scales (nanometers to millimeters) under ambient conditions. This technology has wide-ranging application across the physical and life sciences — from NMR spectroscopy at the scale of individual cells to improved biomedical diagnostics to the search for dark matter. I will provide an overview of quantum diamond sensors and their diverse applications.
Host: Mark Saffman
Video: https://vod.physics.wisc.edu/media/2019_02_18.m4v
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