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NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forums

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Organized by: Prof. Kimberley Palladino


Events During the Week of February 18th through February 25th, 2018

Monday, February 19th, 2018

No events scheduled

Tuesday, February 20th, 2018

The neutrino quantum system and DUNE
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 4274 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Jonathan Miller, Fermilab
Abstract: With the completion of Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) in the next decade, the continuation of this exciting era in neutrino physics is assured. Deep underground, based on Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) technology, with a total fiducial mass of 40-kton and utilizing the high-intensity neutrino beam produced at the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) at Fermilab, the DUNE program is rich and diverse. The center of this program is the measurement of the charge-parity violating phase (δCP), a free parameter in the PMNS matrix, which describes the relationship between neutrino propagating eigenstates and interaction eigenstates. This parameter can be measured by a sensitive measurement of neutrino interference and may be the primary source of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. DUNE is also sensitive to the neutrino ensemble from core-collapse supernovae, providing a unique tool to study astrophysical phenomena. In both situations, the neutrino source (supernova or LBNF), propagation and detection (LArTPC in DUNE) define a quantum system. Understanding and simulating this phenomenologically rich quantum system is important to the success of the DUNE program and opens up additional avenues of investigation.
Host: Sridhara Dasu
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Wednesday, February 21st, 2018

No events scheduled

Thursday, February 22nd, 2018

Where is all the antimatter?
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 4274 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Nuno Barros, University of Pennsylvania
Abstract: Everything we know about the microscopic world tells us that the universe should be composed of equal parts matter and antimatter. All known particle interactions and decays always produce equal amount of each.
Yet all the known, observable, universe is composed solely of matter, suggesting that a small surplus of matter might have taken form shortly after the Big Bang.
A possible explanation for this asymmetry may be that neutrinos, unlike all other fundamental particles of Nature, may have behavior that distinguishes matter and antimatter. Ironically, the property that allows this is that neutrinos
and antineutrinos may be the same thing. Many experiments worldwide that are running or under construction, are investigating this possibility.
This talk will discuss this problem and the different approaches to address it in both present and upcoming neutrino
experiments, with particular emphasis on long baseline neutrino oscillations with DUNE and neutrinoless double beta decay with SNO+. The physics goals and expectations of these experiments will also be discussed.
Host: Sridhara Dasu
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Friday, February 23rd, 2018

No events scheduled
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