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This Week at Physics

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Events on Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

Chaos & Complex Systems Seminar
Twentieth Anniversary Celebration
Time: 12:05 pm
Place: 4274 Chamberlin (refreshments will be served)
Speaker: Robin Chapman, UW Department of Communicative Disorders
Abstract: We will celebrate the 20th anniversary of this weekly seminar with a look at the questions asked across the years and the questions that the audience wants to see answered now. What have we learned, and what's next? Bring your thoughts! The webpage contains abstracts of the twenty years of talks.
Host: Clint Sprott
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"Physics Today" Undergrad Colloquium (Physics 301)
First Light with HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory
Time: 1:20 pm
Place: 2223 Chamberlin
Speaker: Stefan Westerhoff, UW Madison Department of Physics
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Theory Seminar (High Energy/Cosmology)
The Double-Dark Portal
Time: 4:00 pm
Place: 5280 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: David Curtin, Stony Brook University
Abstract: In most models of the dark sector, dark matter is charged under some new symmetry to make it stable. We explore the possibility that not just dark matter, but also the force carrier connecting it to the visible sector is charged under this symmetry. This dark mediator then acts as a Double-Dark Portal. We realize this setup in the dark mediator Dark matter model (dmDM), featuring a fermionic DM candidate chi with Yukawa couplings to light scalars phi. The scalars couple to SM quarks via the operator q q phi phi /Lambda. This can lead to large direct detection signals via the 2->3 process chi N -> chi N phi if one of the scalars has mass < 10 keV. We undertake the first systematic survey of constraints on light scalars coupled to the SM via the above operator, including LHC experiments, cosmological considerations and stellar astrophysics, and find the strongest constraints come from neutron star cooling observations. We also explore the direct detection consequences of this scenario and find that a heavy ~ 100 GeV dmDM candidate fakes different ~ 10 GeV WIMPs at different experiments.
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