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This Week at Physics

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Events During the Week of April 27th through May 4th, 2014

Monday, April 28th, 2014

Cosmology Journal Club
An Informal discussion about a broad variety of arXiv papers related to Cosmology
Time: 12:00 pm
Place: 5242 Chamberlin Hall
Abstract: Please visit the following link for more details:
    http://cmb.physics.wisc.edu/journal/index.html
Please feel free to bring your lunch!
If you have questions or comments about this journal club, would like to propose a topic or volunteer to introduce a paper, please email Le Zhang (lzhang263@wisc.edu)
Host: Peter Timbie
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Plasma Physics (Physics/ECE/NE 922) Seminar
Title to be announced
Time: 12:00 pm
Place: 2241 Chamberlin
Speaker: Hui Shan Cai, University of Science and Technology, China
Host: John Sarff
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Condensed Matter Theory Group Seminar
Title to be announced
Time: 4:30 pm
Place: Chamberlin 5310
Speaker: Daniel Khomskii , University of Cologne, Germany
Host: Perkins
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Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

Chaos & Complex Systems Seminar
Event detection in the Twittersphere
Time: 12:05 pm
Place: 4274 Chamberlin (refreshments will be served)
Speaker: Adel Ardalan, UW Department of Computer Science
Abstract: Twitter has gone viral over the past few years, both in terms of the volume of posted messages and the number of users. People talk about real-world events on Twitter before events start, during the events and after they are finished. In many applications, it is desirable to monitor the Twitter stream and detect the interesting events people are discussing. In this talk, we define and motivate the event detection problem and suggest a model for detecting emerging, dynamic, interesting events. We discuss the challenges we have faced in building a system to generate candidate events based on the aforementioned model in a timely manner and how we have addressed them. Our experiments show promising results both in terms of accuracy of our detection and also the response time of the system.<br>
Host: Clint Sprott
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"Physics Today" Undergrad Colloquium (Physics 301)
LHC Dark Matter Searches
Time: 1:20 pm
Place: 2223 Chamberlin
Speaker: Sridhara Dasu, UW Madison Department of Physics
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Wednesday, April 30th, 2014

Physics Education Innovation Seminar
Social Bookmarking II and new Collaborative Learning Spaces: Experiments in Physics 241 and 207 (Kyriaki Chatzikyriakidou); Learning Assistants in Introductory Physics Courses (Bethany Reilly)
Time: 11:00 am
Place: 5310 Chamberlin Hall
Abstract: Social Bookmarking II and new Collaborative Learning Spaces: Experiments in Physics 241 and 207 (Kyriaki Chatzikyriakidou); Learning Assistants in Introductory Physics Courses (Bethany Reilly)
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Thursday, May 1st, 2014

Astronomy Colloquium
Gas Flows in Galaxy Clusters
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 4421 Sterling Hall
Speaker: Brian McNamara, University of Waterloo
Abstract: Galaxies and clusters are embedded in gaseous hot atmospheres that serve as repositories of unused fuel for galaxy formation, ejecta from evolved stars, and mechanical energy released by supermassive black holes. The hot gas located within the central galaxy is expected to cool and fuel star formation. Yet most giant elliptical galaxies are "red and dead." Instead, cooling is suppressed by powerful radio jets that periodically heat the gas in a self-regulating feedback loop. Radio-mechanical feedback may explain the the dearth of luminous, blue galaxies predicted by standard Lambda-CDM models and the excess of hot baryons in the Universe. I will discuss recent studies showing that radio-mechanical feedback also drives hot outflows at rates of tens of solar masses per year from central cluster galaxies. I will highlight new results from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) showing that the hot gas that has cooled resides in nascent molecular gas disks and plumes of molecular gas clouds flying in and out of the galaxy. The ALMA data for the Abell 1835 BCG indicate a molecular outflow at a rate of ~200 solar masses per year behind a pair of buoyantly rising radio/X-ray bubbles. Apparently, X-ray bubbles couple efficiently to molecular clouds, and this may have broader implication for the evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes.
Host: Brian Morsony
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Friday, May 2nd, 2014

Physics Department Colloquium
Annual Awards Banquet Speaker
Title to be announced
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall (coffee at 4:30 pm)
Speaker: Annual Awards Banquet Speaker
Host: Department of Physics
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