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Department of Physics
Undergraduate Students

Undergraduate Physics Courses

All classes listed in the course descriptions section will be offered regularly unless otherwise noted. Please check with the department office for information on specific courses.

For a complete list of undergraduate courses and programs see the Undergraduate School Catalog. For a an up-to-date listing of all Physics courses see Physics Course listings in the Undergraduate School Catalog.


Physics 103: General Physics

Physics 104: General Physics

Physics 107: The Ideas of Modern Physics

Physics 109: Physics in the Arts

Physics 115: Energy

Physics 198: Directed Study

Physics 199: Directed Study

Physics 201: General Physics

Physics 202: General Physics

Physics 205: Modern Physics for Engineers

Physics 206: Special Topics in Physics

Physics 207: General Physics

Physics 208: General Physics

Physics 241: Introduction to Modern Physics

Physics 244: Modern Physics (Primarily for Ece Majors)

Physics 247: A Modern Introduction to Physics

Physics 248: A Modern Introduction to Physics

Physics 249: A Modern Introduction to Physics

Physics 265: Introduction to Medical Physics

Physics 298: Directed Study

Physics 299: Directed Study

Physics 301: Physics Today

Physics 307: Intermediate Laboratory—Mechanics and Modern Physics

Physics 308: Intermediate Laboratory—Electromagnetic Fields and Optics

Physics 311: Mechanics

Physics 321: Electric Circuits and Electronics

Physics 322: Electromagnetic Fields

Physics 325: Wave Motion and Optics

Physics 371: Acoustics for Musicians

Physics 406: Special Topics in Physics

Physics 407: Advanced Laboratory

Physics 415: Thermal Physics

Physics 448: Atomic and Quantum Physics

Physics 449: Atomic and Quantum Physics

Physics 463: Radioisotopes in Medicine and Biology

Physics 472: Scientific Background to Global Environmental Problems

Physics 498: Directed Study

Physics 499: Directed Study

Physics 501: Radiological Physics and Dosimetry

Physics 505: Topics in Physics

Physics 507: Graduate Laboratory

Physics 522: Advanced Classical Physics

Physics 525: Introduction to Plasmas

Physics 527: Plasma Confinement and Heating

Physics 531: Introduction to Quantum Mechanics

Physics 535: Introduction to Particle Physics

Physics 545: Introduction to Atomic Structure

Physics 546: Lasers

Physics 551: Solid State Physics

Physics 561: Introduction to Charged Particle Accelerators

Physics 619: Microscopy of Life

Physics 623: Electronic Aids to Measurement

Physics 625: Applied Optics

Physics 651: Science for Critical Technologies

Physics 681: Senior Honors Thesis

Physics 682: Senior Honors Thesis

Physics 691: Senior Thesis

Physics 692: Senior Thesis

Updated August 21, 2007

103 General Physics. I, II, SS; 4 cr (r-P-E). Introduction at the non-calculus level. Not recommended for students in the physical sciences and engineering. Principles of mechanics, heat, and sound, with applications to a number of different fields. Three lectures, one discussion section and one two-hour lab per week. P: High school math including some trig; recommended for stdts who do not need a calculus level course. Not open to those who have had Physics 201 or 207. Open to Fr.

104 General Physics. I, II, SS; 4 cr (P-E). Continuation of Physics 103. Principles of electricity and magnetism, light, optics, and modern physics, with applications to a number of different fields. Three lectures, one discussion and one two-hour lab per week. P: Physics 103. Not open to those who have had Physics 202 or 208. Open to Fr.

107 The Ideas of Modern Physics. I, II; 3 cr (r-P-E). For non-science majors. The twentieth century physical world picture and its origins. Selected topics in classical physics: relativity, and the quantum theory with emphasis on the meaning of basic concepts and their broader implications rather than practical applications. Three lectures per week. P: High school alg & geom. Not open to those who have had a 200-level Physics crse. Open to Fr.

109 Physics in the Arts. I, II; 3 cr (r-P-E). A course on sound and light for non-science majors. The nature of sound and sound perception; fundamentals of harmony, musical scales, and musical instruments. Studies of light including lenses, photography, color perception, and color mixing. Two lectures and one two-hour lab per week. P: HS algebra & geometry. Not open to those who have had a 200-level physics course. Open to Fr.

115 Energy. I or II; 3 cr (r-P-E). A one-semester introduction, focusing on a central concept: energy, energy sources, and the environment. Gives students the necessary physics background to form opinions on energy questions. The physical laws of thermodynamics, electricity, and magnetism, and nuclear physics in connection with energy related topics such as: thermal pollution, fossil power, fission and fusion, nuclear power, and solar power. Two lectures and one discussion per week. P: Not open to those who have had Physics 103, 201, or 207. P: Open
to Fr.

198 Directed Study. I, II, SS; 1-3 cr (E). P: Cons inst. Open to Fr.

199 Directed Study. I, II, SS; 1-3 cr (E). P: Cons inst. Open to Fr.

201 General Physics. I, II, SS; 5 cr (r-P-I). Primarily for engineering students. Mechanics and heat. Two lectures, two discussions and one three-hour lab per week. P: Math 211 or 221 or 1 yr HS calc or cons inst. Not open to stdts who have had Physics 207. Degree cr will not be given for both Physics 103 & 201. Open to Fr.

202 General Physics. I, II, SS; 5 cr (P-I). Primarily for engineering students. Electricity, magnetism, light, and sound. Two lectures, two discussions and one three-hour lab per week. P: Physics 201 or equiv. Not open to stdts who have had Physics 208. Degree cr will not be given for both Physics 104 & 202. Open to Fr.

205 Modern Physics for Engineers. I, II; 3 cr (P-I). Introduction to atomic, solid state, and nuclear physics. P: Physics 202 or 208. Not open to those who have had Physics 241 or 244.

206 Special Topics in Physics. I or II or SS; 1-5 cr (I). Special topics in physics at the intermediate undergraduate level. P: Prereqs vary according to topic.

207 General Physics. I, II; 5 cr (r-P-I). Recommended for those majoring in science or mathematics. Also suitable for others who have the math prerequisite. Mechanics, heat and sound. Two lectures, two discussions and one three-hour lab per week. P: Math 221 or 211 or 1 yr HS calc or cons inst. Not open to stdts who have had Physics 201. Degree cr will not be given for both Physics 103 & 207. Open to Fr.

208 General Physics. I, II; 5 cr (P-I). Continuation of Physics 207. Electricity, magnetism, light, and modern physics. Two lectures, two discussions and one three-hour lab per week. P: Physics 207. Not open to stdts who have had Physics 202. Degree cr will not be given for both Physics 104 & Physics 208. Open to Fr.

241 Introduction to Modern Physics. I, II; 3 cr (P-I). Kinetic theory; relativity; experimental origin of quantum theory; atomic structure and spectral lines; topics in solid state, nuclear and particle physics. Experiments for this course are covered in Physics 307. P: Physics 202 or 208 & Math 222. Not open to those who have had Physics 205 or 244.

244 Modern Physics (Primarily for Ece Majors). I, II; 3 cr (P-I). Quantum mechanics, atomic structure of matter, physical properties of solids, nuclear physics; emphasis on fundamental concepts to aid the student in engineering applications. P: Physics 202 or 208. Not open to those who have had Physics 205, or 241.

247 A Modern Introduction to Physics. I; 5 cr (P-I).Introduction to physics recommended for students who are considering majoring in physics, astronomy, astronomy and physics, AMEP. Also suitable for those majoring in science or mathematics. Mechanics, relativity, cosmology. Three lectures, two discussions, and one three-hour lab per week. P: Open to Fr. Math 222 or con reg, or cons inst. Intended primarily for physics, AMEP, astronomy-physics majors. Stdts will receive degree cr for only one of the following crses: Physics 103, 201, 207, 247.

248 A Modern Introduction to Physics. II; 5 cr (P-I). Continuation of Physics 247. Electricity, magnetism, and topics from thermodynamics, radiation, plasma physics, and statistical mechanics. Three lectures, two discussions, and one three-hour lab per week. P: Open to Fr. Physics 247, Math 234 or con reg. Intended primarily for physics, Amep, astronomy-physics majors. Not open to stdts who have had Physics 202 or 208; stdts will receive degree cr for only one of the following crses: Physics 104, 202, 208, 248.

249 A Modern Introduction to Physics. I; 4 cr (P-I). Continuation of Physics 248. Modern physics: introduction to quantum mechanics, topics from nuclear and particle physics, condensed matter physics, and atomic physics. Three lectures and two discussions per week. P: Open to Fr. Physics 248 & Math 234, or cons inst; con reg in Physics 307 required. Intended primarily for physics, AMEP, astronomy-physics majors. Stdts will receive degree cr for only one of the following crses: 205, 241, 244, 249.

265 Introduction to Medical Physics. (Crosslisted with Med Phys) II; 2 cr (P-I). Primarily for premeds and other students in the medical and biological sciences. Applications of physics to medicine and medical instrumentation. Topics: biomechanics, sound and hearing, pressure and motion of fluids, heat and temperature, electricity and magnetism in the body, optics and the eye, biological effects of light, use of ionizing radiation in diagnosis and therapy, radiation safety, medical instrumentation. Two lectures with demonstrations per week. P: A yr crse of college level intro physics.

298 Directed Study. I, II, SS; 1-3 cr (I). P: Intro physics and cons inst.

299 Directed Study. I, II, SS; 1-3 cr (I). P: Intro physics and cons inst.

301 Physics Today. II; 1 cr (I). A series of weekly presentations and discussions of current research topics in physics, by scientists directly involved in those studies. Provides undergraduates with access to the topics and excitement of the research frontier in a manner not possible in normal subject courses. P: Physics 208 or equiv.

307 Intermediate Laboratory—Mechanics and Modern Physics. I; 1 cr (P-A). Experiments in mechanics and modern physics, mainly associated with the subject matter of Physics 241 and 311. P: Physics 202 or 208. Physics 205, 241, or 244 or con reg recommended.

308 Intermediate Laboratory—Electromagnetic Fields and Optics. II; 1 cr (P-A). Experiments in electromagnetic fields and optics, mainly associated with the subject matter of Physics 322 and 325. P: Physics 202 or 208. Physics 205, 241, or 244 recommended. Physics 322 and 325 or con reg recommended.

311 Mechanics. I, II; 3 cr (P-A). Origin and development of classical mechanics; mathematical techniques, especially vector analysis; conservation laws and their relation to symmetry principles; brief introduction to orbit theory and rigid-body dynamics; accelerated coordinate systems; introduction to the generalized-coordinate formalisms of Lagrange and Hamilton. P: Physics 202 or 208, & Math 320 or 319 or cons inst.

321 Electric Circuits and Electronics. I; 4 cr (P-A). Direct current circuits, circuit theorems, alternating current circuits, transients, non-sinusoidal sources, Fourier analysis, characteristics of semiconductor devices, typical electronic circuits, feedback, non-linear circuits; digital and logic circuits; three lectures and one three-hour lab per week. P: Physics 202 or 208, & Math 320 or 319 or cons inst.

322 Electromagnetic Fields. I, II; 3 cr (P-A). Electrostatic fields, capacitance, multi-pole expansion, dielectric theory; magnetostatics; electromagnetic induction; magnetic properties of matter; Maxwell's equations and electromagnetic waves; relativity and electromagmetism. Experiments for this course are covered in Physics 308. P: Physics 311.

325 Wave Motion and Optics. II; 3 cr (P-A). Wave phenomena with specific applications to waves in media and electromagnetic phenomena. Wave equations, propagation, radiation, coherence, interference, diffraction, scattering. Light and its interactions with matter, geometrical and physical optics. Experiments for this course are covered in Physics 308. P: Physics 205, 241, or 244, Physics 311, and 321 (or equiv intro to Fourier analysis). Physics 322 or con reg recommended.

371 Acoustics for Musicians. II; 3 cr (r-P-I). Intended for music students who wish to learn about physical basis of sound, sound perception, musical scales. musical instruments, and room acoustics. May not be taken by Physics majors to count as physics credit. P: Undergrad or Grad st in music, HS algebra. Degree cr not given for both Physics 109 & 371.

406 Special Topics in Physics. I or II; 1-4 cr (A). Special topics in physics at the advanced undergraduate level. P: Physics 241 or cons inst.

407 Advanced Laboratory. II; 1-2 cr (P-A). Advanced experiments in classical and modern physics, many associated with the subject matter of Physics 415, 448, 449. Possible experiments include beta decay, muon lifetime, nuclear magnetic resonance, Stern-Gerlach atomic beam, Mossbauer scattering, velocity of light, Zeeman effect, and Compton scattering. Techniques for the statistical analysis of experimental data are emphasized. One (two) credit students will typically perform 4 (8).experiments. P: Physics 307 or 308 or cons inst.

415 Thermal Physics. I, II; 3 cr (P-A). Thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, and statistical mechanics. P: Physics 241, 244, or 205 & 311.

448 Atomic and Quantum Physics. I; 3 cr (P-A). First semester of a two-semester senior course. Review of atomic and other quantum phenomena and special relativity; introduction to quantum mechanics treating the more advanced topics of atomic physics and applications to molecular, solid state, nuclear, and elementary particle physics and quantum statistics. Experiments underlying this course are covered in Physics 407. P: Physics 205, 241, or 244, and Physics 311 and 322. Not open to those who have had Physics 531.

449 Atomic and Quantum Physics. II; 3 cr (P-A). A continuation of 448. P: Physics 448.

463 Radioisotopes in Medicine and Biology. (Cross-listed with Med Phys) I; 2-3 cr (P-I). Physical principles of radioisotopes used in medicine and biology and operation of related equipment; lecture and lab. P: Intro physics.

472 Scientific Background to Global Environmental Problems. (Crosslisted with Atm Ocn, Envir St) I or II; 3 cr (P-D). A one-semester course designed to provide those elements of physics, atmospheric sciences, chemistry, biology and geology which are essential to a scientific understanding of global environmental problems. Specific examples of such problems include global warming, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain and environmental toxins. Three lectures per week. P: HS algebra & 1 sem college level chem or physics, or cons inst.

498 Directed Study. I, II, SS; 1-3 cr (A). P: Cons inst.

499 Directed Study. I, II, SS; 1-3 cr (A). P: Cons inst.

501 Radiological Physics and Dosimetry. (Cross-listed with Med Phys, H ONcol, BME) I; 3 cr (A). Interactions and energy deposition by ionizing radiation in matter; concepts, quantities and units in radiological physics; principles and methods of radiation dosimetry. P: Calculus and modern physics.

505 Topics in Physics. Irr.; 1-3 cr (P-A). Discussions of recent research. To be offered as need and opportunity arise. Different sections may be offered simul-taneously in two or more areas of physics. May be repeated for credit. P: Cons inst.

507 Graduate Laboratory. II; 2 cr (A). Students perform typically advanced modern physics experiments and utilize advanced statistical techniques for data analysis. Scientific writing is emphasized and one scientific paper is required. P: Physics 307 or 407 or equiv or cons inst.

522 Advanced Classical Physics. Irr.; 3 cr (P-A). Selected topics in classical physics such as vibrations, non-linear mechanics, elasticity, hydrodynamics, acoustics, chaos, and electromagnetic theory. P: Physics 311 and 322 or equiv.

525 Introduction to Plasmas. (Crosslisted with NEEP, ECE) I, II; 3 cr (P-A). Basic description of plasmas: collective phenomena and sheaths, collisional processes, single particle motions, fluid models, equilibria, waves, electromagnetic properties, instabilities, and introduction to kinetic theory and nonlinear processes. Examples from fusion, astrophysical and materials processing plasmas. P: One crse in electromagnetic fields beyond elem physics.

527 Plasma Confinement and Heating. (Crosslisted with ECE, NEEP) Irr.; 3 cr (P-A). Principles of magnetic confinement and heating of plasmas for controlled thermonuclear fusion: magnetic field structures, single particle orbits, equilibrium, stability, collisions, transport, heating, modeling and diagnostics. Discussion of current leading confinement concepts: tokamaks, tandem mirrors, stellarators, reversed field pinches, etc. P: NEEP/Phys/ECE 525 or equiv.

531 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. II; 3 cr
(P-A)
. Historical background and experimental basis, de Broglie waves, correspondence principle, uncertainty principle, Schrodinger equation, hydrogen atom, electron spin, Pauli principle; applications of wave mechanics. P: Physics 311 & 322 & a course in modern physics, or equiv, or cons inst. Not open to those who have had Physics 448.

535 Introduction to Particle Physics. I; 3 cr (P-A). Introduction to particles, antiparticles and fundamental interactions; detectors and accelerators; symmetries and conservation laws; electroweak and color interactions of quarks and leptons; unification theories. P: Physics 531 or equiv.

545 Introduction to Atomic Structure. I; 3 cr (P-A). Nuclear atom; hydrogen atom; Bohr-Sommerfeld model, wave model, electron spin, description of quantum electron spin, description of quantum electrodynamic effects; external fields; many-electron atoms; central field, Pauli principle, multiplets, periodic table, x-ray spectra, vector coupling, systematics of ground states; nuclear effects in atomic spectra. P: A course in quantum mechanics or cons inst.

546 Lasers. (Crosslisted with ECE) II; 2-3 cr (P-A). General principles of laser operation; laser oscillation conditions; optical resonators; methods of pumping lasers, gas discharge lasers, e-beam pumped lasers, solid state lasers, chemical lasers, and dye lasers; gain measurements with lasers; applications of lasers. P: Physics 322 or ECE 420 or equiv; Physics 545, or 449 or 531.

551 Solid State Physics. I, II; 3 cr (P-A). Mechanical, thermal, electric, and magnetic properties of solids; band theory; semiconductors; crystal imperfections. P: A course in quantum mechanics or cons inst.

561 Introduction to Charged Particle Accelerators. (Crosslisted with NEEP, ECE) Irr.; 3 cr (P-A). Charged particle accelerators and transport systems, behavior of particles in magnetic fields, orbit theory, stability criteria, acceleration theory. Applications to different types of accelerators. P: Math 322, EMA 202 or Physics 311, 322 or cons inst.

619 Microscopy of Life. (Crosslisted with Anatomy, BME, Chem, Med Phys, Phmcol-M, Radiol) II; 3 cr (I). Survey of state of the art microscopic, cellular and molecular imaging techniques, beginning with subcellular microscopy and finishing with whole animal imaging. P: 2nd semester intro physics including light & optics (e.g. Physics 104, 202, 208).or cons inst.

623 Electronic Aids to Measurement. (Crosslisted with Atm Ocn) II; 4 cr (P-A). Fundamentals of electronics, electronic elements, basic circuits; combinations of these into measuring instruments. Three lectures and one three-hour lab per week. P: Physics 321 or cons inst.

625 Applied Optics. I; 3-4 cr (P-A). Optical methods in research and technology. Reflection, refraction, absorption, scattering. Imaging. Sources and sensors. Schlieren methods. Interferometry. Instrumental spectroscopy. Fourier optics, image processing, holography. Laser technology, Gaussian beams, nonlinear optics. P: Three semesters of calculus level physics or equiv. Sr or Grad st or cons inst.

651 Science for Critical Technologies. (Crosslisted with Chem, MS&E) Irr.; 3 cr (P-A). Explores how basic science impacts cutting-edge technology, using specific examples taken from technologies of critical importance to the US economy. Speakers from industry and academia. P: Chem 561, Chem 310, MS&E 350 or cons inst.

681 Senior Honors Thesis. 2-3 cr (P-A).

682 Senior Honors Thesis. 2-3 cr (P-A).

691 Senior Thesis. 2 cr (P-A).

692 Senior Thesis. 2 cr (P-A).

Questions? Contact the Department of Physics.


 

 
Last updated: 8/21/2007
 
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