Atomic Physics Seminar

Speaker: Vedika Khemani Stanford University

 

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Speaker: Holger Muller University of California, Berkeley

 

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Friday, May 1st, 2020
Speaker: Jonathan Simon University of Chicago

 

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Speaker: Daniel Slichter NIST

 

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The development of microscopic detection of ensembles of neutral atoms has transformed our ability to study complex many-body systems. Techniques like quantum gas microscopy and optical tweezer arrays grant a unique single-particle-resolved perspective on solid-state analogs and idealized quantum spin models, as well as novel detection capabilities for quantities like entanglement. In this talk, I will describe our progress towards developing these tools for a new atomic species, strontium. In doing so, we establish new prospects enabled by the rich internal degrees-of-freedom associated with alkaline-earth atoms. I will report on our recent results in which we apply our platform to optical atomic clocks, a new application of optical tweezer arrays which indicates a number of strengths for metrology. In particular, I will describe our strategies for reaching arrays with hundreds of tweezers with sub-Hz atom-optical coherence, 41 seconds of atomic coherence, and atomic stability on par with the state-of-the-art. I will then describe our parallel progress towards engineering entanglement on an optical clock transition, as well as new scaling strategies involving atom-by-atom assembly in optical lattice potentials.
Speaker: Adam Kaufman JILA/CU/NIST

 

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The normal state of high-temperature superconductors exhibits anomalous transport and spectral properties that are poorly understood. Cold atoms in optical lattices have been used to realize the celebrated Fermi-Hubbard model, widely believed to capture the essential physics of these materials. The recent development of fermionic quantum gas microscopes has enabled studying Hubbard systems with single-site resolution and extracting equilibrium charge and spin correlations. In this talk, I will report on using a quantum gas microscope to probe the transport and spectral properties of atomic Fermi-Hubbard systems. First, I will describe the development of a technique to measure microscopic charge diffusion, and hence resistivity, in doped Mott insulators. We have found that this resistivity exhibits a linear dependence on temperature and violates the Mott-Ioffe-Regel limit, two signatures of strange metallic behavior [1]. Next, I will discuss how we used the same technique to observe sub- diffusive charge transport in tilted Hubbard systems and present a hydrodynamic model that explains this observation in terms of an interplay of charge and heat transport, allowing the extraction of the infinite temperature heat diffusivity of the system [2]. Finally, I will describe the development of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) for Hubbard systems and its application to studying pseudogap physics in an attractive Hubbard system across the BEC-BCS crossover [3], setting the stage for future studies of the pseudogap regime in repulsive Hubbard systems.

[1] P. Brown et. al., Science 363, 379 (2019)
[2] E. Guardado-Sanchez et. al., PRX 10, 011043 (2020)
[3] P. Brown et. al., Nature Physics 16, 26 (2020)
Speaker: Waseem Bakr Princeton University

 

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Recently it has been proposed to search for particles outside the Standard Model (SM) in an intermediate mass range by means of precision isotope shift spectroscopy on narrow optical transitions. We perform such a measurement on two S → D transitions for five bosonic isotopes of Yb+ with an accuracy of ~ 300Hz, and observe a nonlinearity at the 3.3 σ level in the corresponding King plot. Such a nonlinearity can indicate physics beyond the SM, or higher-order effects within the SM. We identify the second-order field shift as the leading-order effect within the SM for Yb+. The observed nonlinearity pattern is consistent with both the second-order field shift, and with an unknown boson, but larger than expected from either source. In the future, more precise measurements on more transition available for Yb+ and Yb can be used to distinguish between effects within and outside the SM.
Speaker: Vladan Vuletic MIT

 

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The ability to store, transfer, and process quantum information promises to transform how we calculate, communicate, and measure. The realization of large-scale quantum systems that can achieve these tasks is an outstanding challenge and an exciting frontier in modern physics. In the past two decades, superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions emerged as a promising platform for processing quantum information. However, these systems operate at low temperatures and microwave frequencies, and require a coherent interface with optical photons to transfer quantum information across long distances. In this talk, I will present our recent experiments demonstrating quantum transduction of a superconducting qubit excitation to an optical photon. I will describe how we use mesoscopic mechanical oscillators in their quantum ground states to convert single photons from microwave frequencies to the optical domain. I will conclude by discussing the prospects of this approach for realizing future quantum networks based on superconducting quantum processors and mechanical quantum memories.
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Mark Saffman
Speaker: Alp Sipahigil California Institute of Technology

 

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5310 Chamberlin Hall
Monday, February 24th, 2020
tbd
Host: 
Mark Saffman
Speaker: Erhan Saglamyurek University of Alberta

 

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5310 Chamberlin Hall
Monday, February 17th, 2020
tbd
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Mark Saffman
Speaker: Professor Gleb Finkelstein Duke University

 

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