Atomic Physics Seminar

We present results on our Cs ultracold Rydberg atom experiments involv-<br>
ing two classes of ultralong-range Rydberg molecules known as trilobite&quot; and<br>
butter<br>
y&quot; molecules. These molecules are predicted to have giant, body-xed<br>
permanent dipole moments on the order of 1000 Debye. The two classes of<br>
molecules are distinguished by the relative dominance of the s-wave and p-wave<br>
electron scattering. We present spectra for (nS1=2 +6S1=2)3 molecules, where<br>
n = 37, 39 and 40, and measurements of the Stark broadenings of selected<br>
trilobite states in Cs due to the application of a constant external electric eld.<br>
Additionally, we present measurements of spectra and Stark splittings for p-<br>
wave dominated (nS1=2 + 6S1=2)3 molecules, where n = 31 and 32.<br>
Host: 
Saffman
Speaker: Donald Booth University of Oklahoma

 

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Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin
Trapped ions are qubit standards in quantum information science because of their long coherence times and high fidelity entangling gates controlled with external fields. Scaling to very large dimensions may require the use of a modular architecture where trapped ions in separate ion trap modules are entangled using a photonic interface while ions in the same module are entangled using a phonon bus. We report the successful combination of these types of entanglement within and between two modules. We use fast optics to generate heralded remote entanglement between modules at rates exceeding 4 per second, faster than the experimentally measured decoherence rate of the remote entangled state. The resource scaling in such a modular architecture is super-exponential in the ratio of the mean remote entanglement time to the entangled qubit coherence time, and trapped ions are the only experimental system to date where this ratio is small and the overhead is not forbidding.<br>
<br>
Modular quantum networks may involve the use of different types of qubits to create a large scale network. Heralded entanglement between qubits using photon interference is a powerful tool to create entanglement within heterogeneous quantum systems. We experimentally demonstrate the entanglement of non-identical qubits by interfering distinguishable photons emitted from distinguishable trapped ions without significant loss of remote entanglement rate or fidelity.
Host: 
Saffman
Speaker: David Hucul University of Maryland

 

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Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin
Mesoscopic ensembles of ultracold interacting atoms can be implemented by loading the cold atoms into an optical dipole trap. These ensembles are of interest for encoding of quantum information, generation of collective entangled states and observation of cooperative effects in atom-light interactions. Long-range interactions between the atoms in the ensemble lead to the effect of Rydberg blockade when not more than one atom could be excited into a Rydberg state by a narrow-band laser radiation.
The number of atoms in the trap is random and is commonly described by the Poissonian statistics. In the regime of Rydberg blockade an atomic ensemble, which consists of N atoms, can be treated as a two-level system with enhanced coupling to the laser radiation field by a factor of compared to a single atom. A single Rydberg excitation is shared between all atoms in the ensemble. Fluctuations of the frequency of Rabi oscillations between the collective states of the atomic ensembles can result in collapses and revivals of Rabi oscillations, similarly to Jaynes-Cummings model in quantum optics. These fluctuations can also lead to significant errors in quantum information processing. We have proposed to use the adiabatic passage in atomic ensembles for deterministic single-atom excitation and quantum logic gates in ensembles with unknown numbers of atoms. The double adiabatic sequences provide deterministic single-atom Rydberg excitation and remove the accumulation of undesirable dynamic phase. This can be used to implement quantum gates on collectively encoded qubits without precise knowledge of N.
Host: 
Saffman
Speaker: Ilya Beterov Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics :Novosibirsk State University: Novosibirsk, Russia

 

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Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin hall
Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

TBD

Host: 
Saffman
Speaker: Christoph Simon University of Calgary

 

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Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin Hall
An optical dipole trap for alkali metal atoms is one of the most useful ways for a precision spectroscopy and a quantum information processing (QIP). We are interested in eliminating differential ac-Stark shift of atoms in the optical trap between the two ground hyperfine levels to obtain narrow line width and long coherence time. We study the polarization dependence of the Stark shift via vector polarizability and controlled the polarization of the trapping field. We carry out a hyperfine spectroscopy between two ground hyperfine states . We expect that the magic polarization brings breakthroughs in precision measurement and quantum information processing.&lt;br&gt;<br>
Host: 
Mark Saffman
Speaker: Huidong Kim Korea University

 

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Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin Hall

Trapped, cold Rydberg atoms are important in future applications in high-precision measurement, field sensing and quantum information processing. The following topics will be discussed. (1) We use high-resolution atom imaging to measure the Rydberg-Rydberg correlation function in Rydberg-atom samples prepared within the spatially-varying light shifts of a laser trap. We study the pair-correlation behavior as well as direct two-photon excitation of correlated Rydberg-atom pairs in the trap. (2) We employ a standing-wave laser trap in combination with Rydberg-atom position control within the standing wave to show that optical photoionization of a Rydberg atom does not occur within the main lobes of the Rydberg electron’s wave-function, but only within a relatively small volume around the nucleus. This evidence is consistent with the (sometimes unexpected) validity of the electric-dipole approximation for optical Rydberg-atom photoionization. (3) Modulated, spatially inhomogeneous light fields, such as amplitude-modulated optical lattices, can be used to drive multipole microwave transitions between Rydberg levels in a minimally invasive manner. This enables high-precision measurements of atomic properties. I will show first results with this new type of spectroscopy. (4) High-precision spectroscopy will be most promising with circular, Bohr-like Rydberg states. These have long lifetimes and low electric polarizabilities, among other nice features. Towards this, we have recently produced and trapped such atoms with an adiabatic “crossed-fields” state-switching method. Looking ahead, I will briefly discuss how these methods could be combined to perform specific high-precision measurements.

Host: 
Saffman
Speaker: Georg Raithel University of Michigan

 

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Room and Building: 
5280 Chamberlin Hall

Originally inhomegeneities, decoherence and decay of the atomic systems were minimized in quantum computing proposals so that their effects would not disturb the ideal unitary evolution of the system. Recent works, however, suggest a quite opposite strategy, where inhomegeneities are created on purpose and the system is driven on resonance with short lived states such that it dephases and decays to robust steady states. By suitable use of the interactions, these states can be selected, e.g., as entangled states or states encoding the outcome of a quantum computation. We investigate the coherent effects induced by dissipation and decoherence in neutral atom based quantum computing proposals, for creating robust entangled states and long distance gates.

Host: 
Saffman
Speaker: Dr. Durga Dasari Aarhus University, Denmark

 

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Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin Hall
Rydberg atoms are of great interest due to their prospects in quantum information processing. Coherent control of the strong Rydberg-Rydberg interaction allows for the realization of quantum operations and devices such as quantum gates and single-photon sources. To date, impressive experimental progress has been limited to the ultracold domain [1]. Being able to exploit this interaction in a coherent manner in thermal vapor would eliminate the need for cooling and trapping of atoms and thus offer new prospects for applications in terms of integration and scalability.&lt;br&gt;<br>
We present our progress on the coherent control and investigation of Rydberg atoms in small vapor cells. We show that we are able to drive Rabi oscillations on the nanosecond timescale to a Rydberg state by using a pulsed laser excitation and are therefore faster than the coherence time limitation given by the Doppler width [2].&lt;br&gt;<br>
A systematic investigation of the dephasing of these oscillations for different atomic densities and Rydberg S-states (n = 22-40) reveals a clear signature for Rydberg-Rydberg interaction which is the basis for quantum devices based on the Rydberg blockade. Due to the high excitation bandwidth we are probing interaction level shifts up to a few GHz which correspond to very small interatomic distances (&amp;lt; 1μm). Despite the complicated level structure for Rydberg molecular states at these distances we find that the scaling with principle quantum number is still consistent with van der Waals type interaction. The strength of the interaction exceeds the energy scale of thermal motion (i.e. the Doppler broadening) and therefore enables strong quantum correlations above room temperature [3].&lt;br&gt;<br>
Furthermore we present our latest results on the combination of the pulsed Rydberg excitation with a four-wave-mixing scheme [4] and our progress towards the creation of non-classical light. &lt;br&gt;<br>
[1] M. Saffman et al., RMP 82, 2313 (2010) and references therein &lt;br&gt;<br>
[2] B. Huber et al., PRL 107, 243001 (2011) &lt;br&gt;<br>
[3] T. Baluktsian et al., PRL 110, 123001 (2013)&lt;br&gt;<br>
[4] M. Saffman and T. G. Walker, Phys. Rev. A 66, 065403 (2002), M. M. Müller, et al. Phys. Rev. A 87, 053412 (2013)&lt;br&gt;<br>
Host: 
Saffman
Speaker: Prof. Tilman Pfau University of Stuttgart

 

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Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin Hall

The Standard Model and General Relativity have proven to be extraordinarily good at describing the world we live in. Unfortunately, it is not yet clear how these theories are reconciled with one another at extremely high energies. This is one of the puzzles which motivates ongoing experimental and observational searches for new phenomena in high energy, astro-particle, gravitational, and precision measurement physics. Any deviation from the predictions of the Standard Model and General Relativity could point the way towards a unified theory. This talk will describe recent developments in precision tests of the fundamental symmetries underlying both the Standard Model and General Relativity using atomic physics techniques. As I will show, sometimes the most sensitive test of new physics doesn't require observing physics at very high energies, large distances, or extreme gravitational environments. Sometimes the best place to look for extraordinary physics is in what might at first seem to be a rather ordinary place.

Host: 
Thad Walker/Deniz Yavuz
Speaker: Michael Hohensee UC Berkeley

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall

We propose a quantum interface for creating hybrid entanglement between neutral atom and superconducting qubits. The interface is mediated by coupling superconducting qubits to microwaves, and microwaves to Rydberg excited single atoms. Fidelity calculations based on realistic parameters for an atom located close to a CPW microwave resonator, and a progress report on experimental implementation will be presented.

Host: 
Mark Saffman
Speaker: Jonathan Pritchard, UW Madison

 

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Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin Hall

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