NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum

Topics in top-higgs physics and computing for high energy physics
Speaker: Ken Bloom University of Nebraska - Lincoln

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall
MicroBooNE is a liquid argon time projection chamber in the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. The technology provides high-resolution imaging of neutrino interactions leading to low-threshold event reconstruction with full angular coverage. As such, this is an ideal place to probe neutrino-argon interactions in the hundreds-of MeV to few-GeV energy range. This talk presents a start-to-end overview demonstrating the physics capabilities of the detector. I will talk about cosmic ray measurement and characterisation, our dominant background. Furthermore, I will describe the flavour-agnostic neutrino pre-selection, based on the combination of the charge collected by the TPC and the optical information form the PMT system. An overview of recent measurements of neutrino interactions in MicroBooNE, including inclusive charged-current interactions, will be given. I will conclude summarising the ongoing efforts towards our first low-energy-excess results
Host: 
Francis Halzen
Speaker: Wouter Van De Pontseele

 

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Room and Building: 
Chamberlin 4274
Neutrino oscillation experiments such as NOvA and T2K search for the disappearance and appearance of muon and electron flavor neutrinos in a predominately muon-type beam. These experiments are currently measuring the oscillation parameters to greater precision but will not be able to measure the CP phase with enough significance to pin down CP violation in the lepton sector. The next generation of experiments, DUNE and Hyper-Kamiokande, will push the field into its precision era, requiring precise predictions of the flux and neutrino interactions used to measure CP violation.

The MINERvA experiment is a dedicated neutrino interaction experiment set in the NuMI beamline at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The purpose of the experiment is to measure neutrino interactions off a variety of nuclear targets to probe nuclear effects and inform modeling of neutrino interactions. The experiment measures interactions over a wide range of Q2 and W including interactions in the quasi-elastic, resonant, and shallow to deep inelastic scattering regions. The experiment has run with two beam energies peaked at ~3 and 6 GeV in both neutrino and anti-neutrino enhanced modes.

In this seminar, I will describe the current state of neutrino oscillation physics and how MINERvA data will be used in future experiments. I will specifically describe the extensive tuning exercise MINERvA has done to describe interactions in the quasi-elastic into the resonant pion regions of kinematic phase space. I will also discuss the lessons learned and a description of the next generation measurements to prepare for the DUNE experiment.
Host: 
Tianlu Yuan
Speaker: Dan Ruterbories University of Rochester / MINERvA

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall
Neutrino flavor oscillations provided the first break in the Standard Model by proving that neutrinos have nonzero mass, but cannot constrain the absolute mass scale. The most sensitive method to directly measure the mass scale is observation of the tritium beta-decay spectrum endpoint and extraction of the electron antineutrino mass. Project 8 is a next-generation experiment based on the novel Cyclotron Radiation Emission Spectroscopy (CRES) technique to perform a radio-frequency-based measurement of the tritium beta spectrum. The goal of the phased program is to reach a mass sensitivity below 40 meV, completely covering the allowed region of the inverted mass hierarchy. I will present studies performed on the mono-energetic conversion electrons of 83mKr and the ongoing tritium data-taking campaign, which is the first use of the CRES technique for a continuous spectrum measurement. In parallel, an R&D program is being executed to to demonstrate critical technologies for scaling CRES to m^3-scale volumes and for delivering a high-intensity atomic tritium source, establishing a pathway for future experiments based on this technology.
Speaker: Walter Pettus University of Washington

 

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Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin (if available)
Host: 
Balantekin
Speaker: Kanji Mori University of Tokyo

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5290 Chamberlin Hall
Last year, LIGO-VIRGO collaborations reported detection of the first neutron star merger event, GW170817, which accompanied with observations of electromagnetic counterparts from radio to gamma rays. High-energy gamma rays and neutrinos were not observed. However, the mergers of neutron stars are expected to produce these high-energy particles. Relativistic jets are expected to be launched when the neutron stars merge, which can be a source of high-energy neutrinos. Also, the central remnant object after the merger event, either a black hole or a neutron star, can produce high-energy photons weeks to months after the merger. In addition, the neutron star mergers produce massive and fast ejecta, which can be a source of Galactic high-energy cosmic rays, analogous to supernova remnants. In this talk, I will discuss these high-energy processes and prospects for multi-messenger detections related to the neutron star mergers .
Host: 
Francis Halzen
Speaker: Shigeo Kimura PennState

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall
The tau neutrino is the Standard Model particle with the fewest identified events. Most tau-neutrino interactions cannot be distinguished from other flavor neutrino interactions. This is due to the large mass of the tau, which causes the production threshold to open up at a few GeV, and the prompt tau decay. The study of astrophysical neutrinos provides important clues about cosmic particle accelerators. In particular, the tau neutrino fraction at Earth is directly translatable to the source flavor composition and can constrain source production mechanisms. For neutrinos of energies greater than ~100 TeV, IceCube becomes sensitive to the identification of tau-neutrino charged current interaction on an event-by-event basis via the double bang channel. This channel consists two energy depositions one from the tau production and the other from the tau decay. With no significant tau neutrino production expected at the source, IceCube is the first experiment able to observe neutrino oscillations over cosmological baselines. I will present and discuss recent measurements of the astrophysical flavor composition.
Host: 
Carlos Argüelles
Speaker: Juliana Stachurska DESY

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5280 Chamberlin Hall
The Global Feature Extractor (gFEX) subsystem of the ATLAS Level 1 Calorimeter trigger is intended to enhance the selectivity of the L1 trigger and increase sensitivity to key physics channels. The gFEX identifies large-radius jets, typical of Lorentz-boosted objects, by means of wide-area jet algorithms refined with subjet information. The architecture of the gFEX permits event-by-event local pileup suppression for these jets using baseline subtraction techniques comparable to those developed for offline analyses. The gFEX architecture is also suitable for other global event algorithms such as missing Et and centrality-related variables.
Host: 
Kevin Black
Speaker: Sabine Lammers University of Indiana-Bloomington

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5280 Chamberlin Hall
The Standard Model describes the building blocks of matter and their
interactions. It has been tested extensively with experimental data and
found to be incredibly successful in describing nature. Discovering the
Higgs boson in 2012 at the LHC completed the picture of the SM. The LHC
is at the forefront of directly searching for new physics which is
Beyond-Standard-Model (BSM), and I will discuss searches for
supersymmetric partners of the electroweak bosons, as well as
measurement of an extremely rare process with three WWW bosons as
stringent tests of the SM. I will also discuss the instrumentation which
enables such studies. The discussion includes the recently completed CMS
Phase-1 pixel upgrade, as well as the R&D studies towards solving the
future trigger and computing challenges using innovative machine
learning approaches in future high energy experiments.
Host: 
Tulika Bose
Speaker: Miaoyuan Liu Fermilab

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5280 Chamberlin Hall
Line Intensity Mapping (LIM) is an emerging observational technique with applications ranging from cosmology and fundamental physics to astrophysical phenomena that drive galaxy evolution and star formation. By sacrificing resolution in favor of wide-field integrated measurements, LIM experiments are sensitive to the aggregate contributions of sources of all magnitudes and diffuse structures. Probing narrow atomic and molecular transitions allow for three dimensional measurements which will unlock many orders of magnitude more modes compared to those available from the Cosmic Microwave Background. The enormous observational volume probed (~80% of thee observable universe) will yield unprecedented insights into early-Universe inflation, the interactions between galaxies and their environment during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), and the cosmic history of star formation.

I will discuss the current and planned experiments that will fulfill the promise of LIM, with a focus on high redshift 21cm experiments to probe the EoR. Last year the EDGES collaboration made a first tentative detection of a 21cm absorption profile from the Cosmic Dawn, and its unexpected depth shook loose myriad theories related to dark matter-baryon interactions and excess radio background. This watershed of explanations foreshadows the excitement to come as LIM experiments begin to push the frontiers of cosmology and astrophysics.
Host: 
Snezana Stanimirovic & Peter Timbie
Speaker: Adam Beardsley Arizona State University

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4421 Sterling Hall

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