NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum

Line Intensity Mapping (LIM) is an emerging observational technique with applications ranging from cosmology and fundamental physics to astrophysical phenomena that drive galaxy evolution and star formation. By sacrificing resolution in favor of wide-field integrated measurements, LIM experiments are sensitive to the aggregate contributions of sources of all magnitudes and diffuse structures. Probing narrow atomic and molecular transitions allow for three dimensional measurements which will unlock many orders of magnitude more modes compared to those available from the Cosmic Microwave Background. The enormous observational volume probed (~80% of thee observable universe) will yield unprecedented insights into early-Universe inflation, the interactions between galaxies and their environment during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR), and the cosmic history of star formation.

I will discuss the current and planned experiments that will fulfill the promise of LIM, with a focus on high redshift 21cm experiments to probe the EoR. Last year the EDGES collaboration made a first tentative detection of a 21cm absorption profile from the Cosmic Dawn, and its unexpected depth shook loose myriad theories related to dark matter-baryon interactions and excess radio background. This watershed of explanations foreshadows the excitement to come as LIM experiments begin to push the frontiers of cosmology and astrophysics.
Host: 
Snezana Stanimirovic & Peter Timbie
Speaker: Adam Beardsley Arizona State University

 

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Room and Building: 
4421 Sterling Hall
MicroBooNE is a liquid argon time projection chamber which has been running in
the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab since 2015. The primary goal of MicroBooNE is investigation of the excess of electromagnetic events observed by the MiniBooNE collaboration. Due to limitations of the Cherenkov-based particle identification of MiniBooNE,
this excess could be interpreted as either photon-like or electron-like. A photon-like excess would indicate that there are processes which are not well understood which could act as a background in neutrino oscillation measurements, while an electron-like
excess could indicate the presence of sterile neutrinos, the existence of which is one of the most hotly debated questions in the field. This talk will outline MicroBooNE’s strategy for investigation of the MiniBooNE low-energy excess, along with the reconstruction
and calibration work being undertaken to reduce systematic uncertainties in the the analysis of neutrino data in liquid argon.
Host: 
Brian Rebel
Speaker: Adam Lister Lancaster University

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall
MINOS+ is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment with two functionally identical magnetized detectors located in Fermilab's NuMI beamline. Together, MINOS+ and its predecessor, MINOS, have collected 13 years of neutrino data from the NuMI beam as well as the atmosphere. The combined MINOS and MINOS+ dataset measures muon neutrino oscillations in the 3-flavor paradigm unlike any other experiment.
Host: 
Brian Rebel
Speaker: Tom Carroll University of Texas at Austin

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall
Since the Higgs discovery in 2012, the LHC has not found any
conclusive evidence for the presence of New Physics (NP) at the weak
scale. While there are stringent limits on strongly interacting NP, the
weakly interacting sector is minimally constrained. In addition, dark
matter direct detection experiments have been putting increasingly
stringent bounds on the cross sections of dark matter particles
scattering off nuclei. This has led to wide spread pessimism regarding
the WIMP paradigm, and most well studied SUSY models such as the MSSM or
the NMSSM. I take a different view point. What if the lack of evidence,
instead of being due to absence of NP at the weak scale, is actually
telling us where NP could be hiding? In that spirit I will discuss the
implications for an extended Higgs sector of a SM-like Higgs in generic
2HDMs+, using the NMSSM as motivation. Next I will talk about the
possible connections of 2HDMs with dark matter using an EFT formulation,
particularly focusing on the connotations of null signals in direct
detection experiments. Finally, I will discuss some tantalizing recent
results from electroweakino searches at the LHC, showing how these may
be consistent with astrophysical observations, and fit naturally in the
MSSM/NMSSM setup.
Host: 
Kevin Black
Speaker: Prof Nausheen Shah Fermilab

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5280 Chamberlin Hall
Roughly 9 months after the end of the 5-year transient search in the Dark Energy Survey (DES), DES submitted a series of papers describing its first cosmology results based on measuring cosmic distances for a small fraction of the Type Ia Supernova sample. I will give an overview of DES, our first results, and the analysis, highlighting where we have made improvements necessary to reduce uncertainties. I will also briefly describe future prospects for SN Ia cosmology with DES (full sample) and the WFIRST space mission.
Host: 
Keith Bechtol
Speaker: Richard Kessler University of Chicago

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall
Host: 
Baha Balantekin
Speaker: Danielle Speller Wright Laboratory, Yale University

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5280 Chamberlin Hall
We propose a dedicated search for minicharged particles (MCP) and light dark matter at Fermilab utilizing proton-fixed target facilities. First, we present the constraints and sensitivity reaches considering the MCP scattering with the electrons in the neutrino detectors, including SBND, MiniBooBE, MicroBooNE, DUNE, and SHiP [1]. Secondly, we present a new proposal, FerMINI, to place a new detector to further improve the sensitivity. The potential sites include the MINOS hall downstream of NuMI beamline and the proposed DUNE near detector hall along the LBNF beamline. The setup would drastically improve the sensitivity of MCPs in the MeV to GeV mass regime and will be discussed in detail in this talk. I will also talk about the searches of other weakly interacting particles, including light scalars, dark photons, and dipole portal heavy neutral leptons (an explanation of MiniBooNE anomaly) [2, 3] if time allows. [1] arXiv:1806.03310 [2] arXiv:1803.03262 [3] arXiv:1706.00424
Host: 
Carlos Arguelles
Speaker: Yu-dai Tsai FNAL

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall
Host: 
Sridhara Dasu
Speaker: Kenneth Long University of Wisconsin

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4272 Chamberlin
Following the discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a major goal is to characterize the properties of this new particle. The Higgs itself is a potential portal to new physics, providing connections between the Standard Model of particle physics and new phenomena, such as signatures of dark matter. Searches for new decays of the Higgs boson will be described using data collected by the ATLAS experiment and future prospects will be discussed.
Host: 
Kevin Black
Speaker: Verena Martinez UMASS Amherst

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin Hall
The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) provides a unique window on the physics of the early Universe and measurements of CMB polarization offer the potential of a definitive test of inflation. Many of the advances in the field of CMB science have been enabled by advances in detector technology. Ground-based CMB experiments have seen order of magnitude increases in detector count with each subsequent stage with current stage-3 experiments fielding ~10K detectors. In this talk I will provide an overview of CMB detector development at Argonne. For over a decade we have been developing transition edge sensors (TES) through our collaboration with the South Pole Telescope, resulting in the delivery of detectors for the SPTpol and SPT-3G experiments. Current efforts are focused on developing detectors for the CMB-S4 experiment, which is expected to have ~ 300K detectors. I will discuss issues of detector design, fabrication, and testing necessary to realize the large detector counts of these experiments.
Host: 
Peter Timbie
Speaker: Tom Cecil Argonne National Lab

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5280 Chamberlin Hall

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