NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum

I will give an overview of the status of the field focussing on the implication of the new results from the summer conferences for the future direction. I will then talk about some of the more exciting and innovative options for the future, specifically with FNAL's NuMI beam.
Host: 
Albrecht Karle
Speaker: Jenny Thomas University College London

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin

I will present the design and implementation of the Microwave Detection of Air Showers (MIDAS) experiment, a pathfinder for detection of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) induced by Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs). The MIDAS experiment uses a multi-pixel imaging telescope instrumented with commercially sourced GHz receivers and custom fast-detection electronics to search for EAS. The microwave detection technique is analogous to the already successful fluorescence technique, but with nearly 100% duty cycle. If successful, the microwave technique will provide an attractive method for instrumenting the extremely large areas required by future UHECR observatories. The first science phase of the MIDAS experiment gathered 61 days of livetime data operating on the University of Chicago campus. I will present the current limits on EAS microwave emission from this data set. The second science phase is underway with installation of the MIDAS detector at the Pierre Auger Observatory in MalargA1/4e, Argentina. Operating in coincidence with the Auger surface detector will greatly increase the sensitivity of the MIDAS experiment.

Host: 
Peter Timbie
Speaker: Christopher Williams Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall

Lorentz symmetry posits that the laws of physics are invariant regardless of the orientation and velocity of the reference frame in which they are measured. Violation of this symmetry can be quantified using the Standard-Model Extension (SME) framework, which predicts the effects that Lorentz violation would have on elementary particles and their interactions. This model predicts a dependence of the production cross section for top and antitop quark pairs on sidereal time as the orientation of the experiment changes with the rotation of the Earth. In this talk I will present the results of a search for Lorentz violation in ttI,, events using data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, setting upper limits on parameters within the SME describing the possible strength of Lorentz violation in the top sector. I will also investigate the prospects for extending this analysis using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider which, because of the higher rate of top-antitop events at that experiment, has the potential to improve the limits determined at D0.

Host: 
Karle
Speaker: Denver Whittington Indiana University

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin
Host: 
Albrecht Karle
Speaker: Melanie Day University of Rochester

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin
Host: 
Halzen
Speaker: Sean Carroll Caltech

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin
The ARGO-YBJ experiment at YangBaJing in Tibet (4300 m a.s.l.) has been taking data with its full layout since November 2007. A few significant results obtained in gamma-ray astronomy and cosmic-ray physics are presented. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of gamma-ray emission from point-like sources, on the limit on the antiproton/proton flux ratio, on the measurement of the Mean Interplanetary Magnetic field, on the large-scale cosmic-ray anisotropy and on the protonaEuro"air cross-section. The performance of the detector is also discussed, and the perspectives of the experiment are outlined.
Host: 
Paolo Desiati
Speaker: Dr. Roberto Iuppa University of Rome "Tor Vergata", Roma, Italy

 

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Room and Building: 
4274

We discuss the physics potential of a neutrino beam sent from one of the major accelerator laboratories on the Northern hemisphere to possible upgrades of the DeepCore array, named PINGU or MICA. As one possibility, we demonstrate that due to the parametric enhancement of the oscillation probability using a core-crossing baseline, a NuMI-like superbeam to PINGU with a relatively low intensity could easily measure the mass hierarchy.

Host: 
Albrecht Karle
Speaker: Walter Winter University of Würzburg, Germany

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall

Time reversal is not a perfect symmetry of nature as evidenced by decays of K and B mesons. This means that physical processes and even the properties of atoms and elementary particles would change with the reversal of time. Assuming charge-conjugation-parity (CPT) invariance, T- invariance implies CP invariance, an essential element of baryogenesis, the generation of more matter, compared to antimatter, in the early universe. CP-invariance violation has been observed in the decays of K and B mesons, and is incorporated into the Standard Model of particle physics, but it it not sufficient to produced the observed baryon asymmetry. So we search on for new manifestations of CP or T invariance violation. Observing a permanent electric dipole moment of an atom or the neutron (sometimes called the Z=0 atom) would be direct evidence of T violation and would set the scale for new physics that could generate the baryon asymmetry. T-violating observables in neutron decay include the correlations of neutron spin with the proton and electron momentum. I will discuss EDM experiments using rare isotopes as well as neutron experiments including the recently complete emiT-II experiment.

Host: 
Michael Ramsey-Musolf
Speaker: Tim Chupp University of Michigan

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin

Whether or not the neutrino is a Majorana particle is a fundamental question in particle physics. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay is a direct attempt to answer this question. The GERDA experiment, which started taking data last year, is such a search. After an introduction, the experiment status and plans will be described.

Host: 
Westerhoff
Speaker: Allen Caldwell Director, Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich, Germany

 

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Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin
Despite overwhelming evidence that it composes the vast majority of the mass in the Universe, dark matter's particle properties literally remain in the dark. Identifying the mysterious nature of dark matter is one of today's most pressing scientific problems and is being sought for using colliders, direct-detection experiments, and powerful indirect techniques. With the completion of the gigaton-scale IceCube neutrino telescope a new era in astro-particle physics has begun.

IceCube exploits the excellent optical properties of the ice beneath the South Pole to detect neutrinos through the Cherenkov light emission of secondary particles produced by neutrino interactions. Its unprecedented size will finally allow us to address long standing questions such as the sources of cosmic rays and unknown properties of neutrinos. IceCube further provides a novel discovery potential for dark matter through striking neutrino signatures that may further shed light on its fundamental particle properties and its distribution in the Milky Way. I will discuss our recent results on the search for dark matter and new ways to achieve greater sensitivity. I will conclude by discussing ideas towards a new low-energy threshold multi-megaton ice Cherenkov array (MICA). Such a detector would provide exciting possibilities for the study of neutrino properties, supernova burst neutrinos, Galactic neutrino sources, and dark matter.

Host: 
Halzen
Speaker: Carsten Rott Ohio State University

 

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Room and Building: 
5280 Chamberlin Hall

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