NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum

Quark matter at high density and low temperature is expected to be a color superconductor, which is a degenerate Fermi gas of quarks with a condensate of Cooper pairs near the Fermi surface. At the highest densities, where the QCD coupling is weak, rigorous calculations are possible, and the ground state is a particularly symmetric state, the color-flavor locked (CFL) phase. At lower densities the CFL phase suffers from flavor-symmetry-breaking stresses, so alternative phases,
some of which break translation and/or rotation invariance, may be favored. I will review the state of our understanding of these phenomena, and discuss the effort to develop signatures of the presence of color superconducting quark matter in neutron stars.
Host: 
Michael J. Ramsey-Musolf
Speaker: Mark Alford Washington University

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin
Octave-spanning, mode locked femtosecond laser frequency combs convert
the most precise instrument available today - the atomic clock - to the frequency domain, providing an equally precise yardstick for wavelength calibration, potentially 1:10^15. Precision at this level enables astronomical radial velocity measurements to 1 cm/sec over decadal time scales. This capability will make it possible to search for earth-like planets orbiting solar type-stars in the habitable zone and to measure the expansion of the universe directly, as well as to explore the local distribution of dark matter and to search for variations of fundamental constants over cosmological time scales. I discuss the techniques, status and potential of this instrumentation as well as ongoing and future observational programs in pursuit of these scientific objectives.
Host: 
Francis Halzen
Speaker: Andrew Szentgyorgyi Harvard CFA

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin
With the installation of the last two lines in May 2008, ANTARES (Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and Abyss environmental RESearch) is currently the largest neutrino detector in the Northern Hemisphere. The detector consists of 12 lines, carrying
almost 900 ten-inch photomultipliers (PMTs), placed at a depth of 2500 m in the Mediterranean Sea, about 40 km offshore Toulon in South France. The PMTs detect the Cerenkov light emitted by muons from neutrino charged current interactions in the surrounding seawater and the rock below. The information provided by the number of photons detected and their arrival times is used to infer the neutrino track direction. Thanks to its exceptional angular resolution, better than 0.3◦ above 10 TeV, ANTARES
is especially suited for the search of astrophysical point-like sources. The first data collected with the 5-Line detector, which covers the period from January to December 2007, have been analyzed to look for a possible neutrino excess from a
list of prospective neutrino sources. In this talk, the current status of the ANTARES neutrino telescope, including the first
results obtained from the analysis of the 5-Line data, will be presented.
Host: 
Teresa Montaruli
Speaker: Simona Toscano Valencia

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin
We examine the nature of electroweak Baryogenesis when the Higgs boson's properties are modified by the effects of new physics. We utilize the effective potential to one loop while retaining parametrically enhanced dimension six operators of O(v^2/f^2) in the Higgs sector. These parametrically enhanced operators would be present if the Higgs is a pseudo-goldstone boson of a new physics sector with a characteristic mass scale Lambda ~ a few TeV, a coupling constant (4 pi) > g > 1 and a strong decay constant scale f = Lambda/g. We find that generically the effect of new physics of this form allows a sufficiently first order electro-weak phase transition so that the produced Baryon number can avoid washing out, and has enhanced effects due to new sources CP violation. The conditions we find for pseudo-goldstone baryogenesis to occur are examined in the context of Little Higgs models, and are found to give surprising insights into the nature of some of the viable parameter space for Little Higgs models.
Host: 
S Mantry
Speaker: Mike Trott Perimeter Institute

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin

I will describe the scientific and technical issues concerning building a very large detector at the new Homestake deep underground science and engineering laboratory and a new intense neutrino beam from Fermilab.

Host: 
Albrecht Karle
Speaker: Milind Diwan BNL

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin
Tolman pointed out that if a cyclic universe model has<br>
to be consistent with the second law of<br>
thermodynamics, the cycles must inevitably shrink to<br>
zero as one goes back in time (cycles). I will provide<br>
a simple cosmological paradigm which avoids this<br>
&quot;super Big Bang&quot;. Moreover we will see that in these<br>
&quot;Emergent cyclic models&quot; new mechanisms for generating<br>
scale-invariant fluctuations can naturally emerge.<br>
<br>
Host: 
Daniel Chung
Speaker: Tirthabir Biswas Pennsylvania State University

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5280 Chamberlin

QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations provide a continuum framework within which hadron structure and interactions can be studied. Nonperturbative, symmetry-preserving truncations exist so that model-independent predictions can be made and illustrated. Insights that this approach yields into meson and nucleon structure will be explained.

Host: 
M J Ramsey-Musolf
Speaker: Craig Roberts Argonne National Laboratory

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin

If supersymmetry is realized in nature, even at some very high
energy scales, it has important cosmological consequences.
A generic prediction of supersymmetry is the flat directions
in the potential, along which a scalar condensate can form at
the end of inflation. This condensate is generically unstable;
its evolution and its fragmentation into Q-balls can generate
the baryon asymmetry, dark matter, and the gravity waves that
can be observed by upcoming detectors.

Host: 
M J Ramsey-Musolf
Speaker: Alex Kusenko UCLA

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin
Host: 
Stefan Westerhoff
Speaker: Kendall Mahn Columbia University

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin

The LHC is expected to shed light on the physics behind the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, associated with the generation of mass of all known elementary particles. There are good reasons to think that the same physics is responsible for the origin of dark matter and, perhaps, of the observable matter-antimatter asymmetry. In this talk I will summarize the arguments that support the above statements and provide a few examples of the interplay between cosmology and collider physics at the LHC.

Host: 
M J Ramsey-Musolf
Speaker: Carlos E M Wagner Argonne National Laboratory & University of Chicago

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin

Pages

©2013 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System