Other

Getting all the information out of a dense academic article is a challenge no matter what point you’re at in your physics career. Even if you’re reading a paper very close to your field, language, figures, and presentation style can act as barriers to understanding the take-home message of the work. I’ll cover strategies for approaching articles geared towards overcoming these barriers. You’ll improve your research efficiency by being able to interpret the motivations, methods, results, and implications of an article after a 5-minute read.
Host: 
Rob Morgan, graduate student
Speaker: Alex Pizzuto Physics Graduate Student

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5280 Chamberlin Hall
Friday, February 28th, 2020
For admitted students only
Host: 
Michelle Holland, Graduate Program Coordinator
Speaker: na na

 

Available Downloads:

Friday, February 14th, 2020
For admitted students only
Host: 
Michelle Holland, Graduate Program Coordinator
Speaker: na na

 

Available Downloads:

Wednesday, April 1st, 2020
Host: 
Shimon Kolkowitz
Speaker: Jeff Thompson Princeton University

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin
Our nearest large spiral galaxy neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy (M31), and its dwarf satellites, offer a panoramic yet detailed view of galaxy formation and evolution in our astronomical backyard. This system also serves as an excellent laboratory for the study of stellar populations because the stars are all practically at the same distance from us. I will present results from the SPLASH (Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda's Stellar Halo) survey, the backbone of which was a large Keck DEIMOS spectroscopic survey of evolved stars in M31. Most of the SPLASH spectroscopic targets in M31's disk were selected from the PHAT (Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury) survey, a wide-field 6-filter Hubble Space Telescope mosaic image of a portion of the disk of M31. The talk will cover a range of science topics including: Local Group dynamics, structure/substructure and metallicity of M31's stellar halo, satellite tidal interactions, disk/halo interface, dynamical heating of the disk, and rare stellar populations.
Host: 
Professor Tremonti and Professor Bershady
Speaker: Raja GuhaThakurta UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California Santa Cruz

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4421 Sterling Hall
Thursday, October 17th, 2019
In this workshop we will begin with the basics and talk through strategies and steps to create a winning resume. Good resume’s don’t get you jobs but great ones do! From the various parts of a resume to the fine details that really matter, this workshop will include a 10 point checklist to ensure you focus on what really matters. After this workshop you will have the skills, tools, and know how to update your existing resume or start from scratch if you don’t have one yet. Feel free to bring any resume related questions to the workshop.
Host: 
Rob Morgan, graduate student
Speaker: Michelle Holland Physics Graduate Programs Coordinator

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin Hall
The first Physics Graduate Student Council Professional Development Seminar! We will briefly outline the topics for the semester as an introduction to the seminar series. This session will focus on the importance of making yourself and your work accessible to collaborators and potential employers. Personal websites are the perfect tools for this purpose. There will be a step-by-step walkthrough to create a free, easy-to-use personal website. By the end, everyone will be online! Visit https://rmorgan10.github.io/UWMadisonPGSC-PD/ for more information.
Host: 
Rob Morgan, graduate student
Speaker: Rob Morgan Physics PhD Graduate Student

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
5310 Chamberlin Hall
Thursday, September 26th, 2019
This talk's journey will depart from the often present science-art dichotomy, exploring the complicated, often unexpected relationship that physics and the arts share. This complex relationship provides opportunities for fresh storytelling, in particular physics narratives embedded in a wider culture and interdisciplinary explorations in classrooms and beyond. I argue that science and the arts acting in concert may deliver benefits beyond science communication, addressing questions of social justice, and become an influencer of a more equitable world.
Host: 
Women and Gender Minorities in Physics (GMaWiP)
Speaker: Agnes Mocsy Pratt Institute

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
4274 Chamberlin Hall
Prof. Alan Watson from the University of Leeds will discuss the current observations and our understanding of cosmic ray particles in the Universe today. What are cosmic rays? What are the accelerators in the Universe that can generate these extremely energetic particles? Prof. Watson is one of the world’s experts in this field. The Victor Hess public lecture is given as a highlight public event during the International Cosmic Ray Conference.
Host: 
Tom Gaisser, University of Delaware; Albrecht Karle, University of Wisconsin–Madison
Speaker: Alan Watson University of Leeds

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
Memorial Union, Shannon Hall
Physics degree holders are among the most employable in the world, often doing everything from managing a research lab at a multi-million dollar corporation, to developing solutions to global problems in their own small startups. Science and Technology employers know that with a physics training, a potential hire has acquired a broad problem-solving skill set that translates to almost any environment, as well as an ability to be self-guided and -motivated so that they can teach themselves whatever is needed to be successful at achieving their goals. Therefore it's no surprise that the majority of physics graduates find employment in private--sector, industrial settings. At the same time, only about 25% of graduating PhDs will take a permanent faculty position--yet academic careers are usually the only track to which students are exposed while earning their degrees.

In this talk, I will explore less-familiar (but more common!) career paths for physics graduates, and will provide information on resources to boost your career planning and job hunting skills.
Host: 
Neil Campbell, Graduate Student
Speaker: Crystal Bailey American Physical Society (APS)

 

Available Downloads:

Room and Building: 
B343 Sterling Hall

Pages

©2013 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System