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Events at Physics

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Events on Thursday, November 5th, 2020

Cosmology Journal Club
Time: 12:00 pm
Place:
Abstract: Cosmology Journal Club is back! We will be having virtual meetings this semester.

Each week, we start with a couple scheduled 15 minute talks about one's research, or an arXiv paper. The last 30 minutes will typically be open to the group for anyone to discuss an arXiv paper.

All are welcome and all fields of cosmology are appropriate.

Contact Ross Cawthon, cawthon@wisc, for more information.
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NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum
Study of triple heavy boson production at the LHC
Time: 3:00 pm
Place: Zoom : https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/91932930074?pwd=ZWJHaU02K2pHZCswZXJHdWx1Y2Vzdz09
Speaker: Hannsjörg Weber, Fermilab
Host: Sridhara Dasu
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Astronomy Colloquium
The Experiment for Cryogenic Large-aperture Intensity Mapping (EXCLAIM)
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: Zoom meeting(see Abstract ) Coffee and tea 3:30pm, Talk 3:45pm
Speaker: Eric Switzer, NASA/Goddard
Abstract: The EXperiment for Cryogenic Large-Aperture Intensity Mapping (EXCLAIM) is a cryogenic balloon-borne instrument that will survey galaxy and star formation history over cosmological time scales. Rather than identifying individual objects, EXCLAIM will be a pathfinder to demonstrate an intensity mapping approach, which measures the cumulative redshifted line emission. EXCLAIM will operate at 420-540 GHz with a spectral resolution R=512 to measure the integrated CO and [CII] in redshift windows spanning 0 < z < 3.5. CO and [CII] line emissions are key tracers of the gas phases in the interstellar medium involved in star-formation processes. EXCLAIM will shed light on questions such as why the star formation rate declines at z < 2, despite continued clustering of the dark matter. The instrument will employ an array of six superconducting integrated grating-analog spectrometers (micro-spec) coupled to microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). I will present an overview of the EXCLAIM instrument design and status.

The Zoom Link:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88513896776?pwd=Y1JtRE1KZllxWkFTamJBSGtGdm9yQT09
Host: Peter Timbe, UW Physics Dept
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