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This Week at Physics

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Events on Thursday, April 11th, 2019

Cosmology Journal Club
Time: 12:00 pm
Place: 5242 Chamberlin Hall
Abstract: Please visit the following link for more details:
http://cmb.physics.wisc.edu/journal/index.html
Feel free to bring your lunch!
If you have questions or comments about this journal club, would like to propose a topic or volunteer to introduce a paper, please email Ross Cawthon (cawthon@wisc.edu) and Santanu Das (sdas33@wisc.edu).
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NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum
High-energy emissions from neutron star mergers
Time: 2:00 pm
Place: 4274 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Shigeo Kimura, PennState
Abstract: Last year, LIGO-VIRGO collaborations reported detection of the first neutron star merger event, GW170817, which accompanied with observations of electromagnetic counterparts from radio to gamma rays. High-energy gamma rays and neutrinos were not observed. However, the mergers of neutron stars are expected to produce these high-energy particles. Relativistic jets are expected to be launched when the neutron stars merge, which can be a source of high-energy neutrinos. Also, the central remnant object after the merger event, either a black hole or a neutron star, can produce high-energy photons weeks to months after the merger. In addition, the neutron star mergers produce massive and fast ejecta, which can be a source of Galactic high-energy cosmic rays, analogous to supernova remnants. In this talk, I will discuss these high-energy processes and prospects for multi-messenger detections related to the neutron star mergers .
Host: Francis Halzen
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Astronomy Colloquium
"Molecular clouds and star formation in dwarf irregular galaxies"
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 4421 Sterling Hall, Coffee and cookies 3:30 PM, Talk begins 3:45 PM
Speaker: Deidre Hunter, Lowell Observatory
Abstract: Dwarf irregular galaxies are tiny compared to spirals, but they are the most numerous galaxy type in the universe. The conditions for star formation in dwarfs are different from those in spirals, and thus they give us an opportunity to challenge our ideas about star formation and galaxy evolution. I will discuss observations on the structure and formation of molecular clouds and issues of star formation in these little galaxies.
Host: Jay Gallagher
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