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This Week at Physics

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Events During the Week of May 3rd through May 10th, 2015

Monday, May 4th, 2015

No events scheduled

Tuesday, May 5th, 2015

"Physics Today" Undergrad Colloquium (Physics 301)
Superconductivity
Time: 1:20 pm
Place: 2120 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Bob Joynt, UW Madison Department of Physics
Host: Smith
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Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

No events scheduled

Thursday, May 7th, 2015

NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum
Title to be announced
Time: 2:30 pm
Place: 5280 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Anatoli Fedynitch, Karlsruhe
Abstract: TBA
Host: Paolo Desiati
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Friday, May 8th, 2015

Cosmology Journal Club
An Informal discussion about a broad variety of arXiv papers related to Cosmology
Time: 12:15 pm
Place: 5242 Chamberlin Hall
Abstract: Please visit the following link for more details:
    http://cmb.physics.wisc.edu/journal/index.html
Please feel free to bring your lunch!
If you have questions or comments about this journal club, would like to propose a topic or volunteer to introduce a paper, please email Le Zhang (lzhang263@wisc.edu)
Host: Peter Timbie
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Physics Department Colloquium
Distinguished Alumni Award Winner
Where Did Half the Starlight in the Universe Go?
Time: 4:30 pm
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall (coffee at 3:30 pm)
Speaker: Mark Devlin, University of Pennsylvania
Abstract: We believe that approximately half of all the light from stars is absorbed and reprocessed by dust. The resulting emission is grey body with a temperature near 30 Kelvin. The COBE satellite made the first measurements of the resulting Far Infrared Background (FIRB), but since that time, we have been unable to resolve the background into individual galaxies. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) was designed to do this job. Its three bands at 250, 350, and 500 microns span the peak in emission for galaxies at z=1. I will discuss the BLAST experiment and present results from our measurements of resolved and unresolved galaxies. I will also discuss the implications for star formation in our own galaxy and how dust is changing the way we look at current and future searches for primordial gravity waves with the Cosmic Microwave Background.
Host: Walker
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