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This Week at Physics

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Events During the Week of February 10th through February 17th, 2019

Sunday, February 10th, 2019

Wonders of Physics
Physics of the Periodic Table
Time: 1:00 pm
Place: 2103 Chamberlin
Speaker: Clint Sprott and others, UW Department of Physics
Abstract: This 36th annual fun-filled presentation of dramatic physics demonstrations is aimed at families and individuals. Free tickets are available from http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/tickets.htm
Host: Clint Sprott
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Wonders of Physics
Physics of the Periodic Table
Time: 4:00 pm
Place: 2103 Chamberlin
Speaker: Clint Sprott and others, UW Department of Physics
Abstract: This 36th annual fun-filled presentation of dramatic physics demonstrations is aimed at families and individuals. Free tickets are available from http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/tickets.htm
Host: Clint Sprott
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Monday, February 11th, 2019

Astronomy Colloquium
Special Monday 2/11/19
Structure formation and turbulent processes in the Universe: from cosmology to star formation
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 4421 Sterling Hall, Coffee and cookies 3:30 PM, Talk begins 3:45 PM
Speaker: Philip Mocz, Princeton University, Einstein postdoc Fellow
Abstract: Much of structure formation in the Universe involves self-gravity and turbulence. In my talk I will explore the formation and evolution of structure in several contexts, including cosmology (scalar field dark matter), the early universe (oscillons), and star formation. Our theoretical understanding of such systems and processes is incomplete. While diverse, these physical systems turn out to have rich, not fully explored mathematical connections as well. I develop high-performance numerical simulations to aid in building a theoretical picture of fundamental, ubiquitous physical processes, taking an interdisciplinary and unifying approach. The theory is then applied to understand astrophysical consequences and make observational predictions (for JWST, gravitational waves, polarization measurements) that may be used to constrain unknown physical system parameters.
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Tuesday, February 12th, 2019

Chaos & Complex Systems Seminar
Books build better brains: How promoting literacy is key to early brain and child development
Time: 12:05 pm
Place: 4274 Chamberlin (refreshments will be served)
Speaker: Dipesh Navsaria, UW Department of Pediatrics
Abstract: Dr Navsaria will discuss the critical importance of the first thousand days of life and the key role human relationships and interactions play in that time period, along with concepts of toxic stress and how early adversity leads to lifelong issues. The importance of early literacy, along with key concepts about literacy development will be reviewed. The structure and concept behind the Reach Out and Read program (which provides early literacy promotion) will be discussed in this context as a workable approach for busy primary-care medical settings.
Host: Clint Sprott
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Council Meeting
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 2314 Chamberlin Hall
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Wednesday, February 13th, 2019

Plasma Physics (Physics/ECE/NE 922) Seminar
Fusion concept exploration and basic plasma shock research on the Plasma Liner Experiment at Los Alamos
Time: 12:05 pm
Place: 4274 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Scott Hsu, Los Alamos National Lab
Abstract: The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) was built in 2010-2011 at Los Alamos National Laboratory to conduct experiments on hypersonic merging plasma jets formed by pulsed-power-driven railguns and coaxial plasma guns. Over the years, experiments on PLX have pursued both driver development for plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF, a fusion concept) and fundamental experimental studies of plasma shocks. This seminar will provide a review of results from PLX, touching on results from the references below, emphasizing the most recent three-year period, and concluding with a brief discussion of our proposed BRB experiments motivated by fusion target development for PJMIF. This work has been supported by US-DOE (FES, ARPA-E, and LDRD).

T. J. Awe et al, PoP 18, 072705 (2011).
S. C. Hsu et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 1287 (2012).
S. C. Hsu et al., PoP 19, 123514 (2012).
E. C. Merritt et al., PRL 111, 085003 (2013); PoP 21, 055703 (2014).
A. L. Moser et al., PoP 22, 055707 (2015).
C. S. Adams et al, PRE 92, 051101(R) (2015).
S. J. Langendorf and S. C. Hsu, PoP 24, 032704 (2017).
S. C. Hsu et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 46, 1951 (2018).
S. J. Langendorf et al., PRL 121, 185001 (2018).
S. C. Hsu and S. J. Langendorf, J. Fusion Energy 38, 182 (2019).
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Department Meeting
Time: 12:15 pm
Place: 5310 Chamberlin Hall
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Thursday, February 14th, 2019

R. G. Herb Condensed Matter Seminar
Quantum realizations of non-Hermitian (PT-symmetric) systems
Time: 10:00 am
Place: 5310 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Prof. Yogesh Joglekar, Indianapolis
Abstract: Open systems with gain or losses, or both, described by non-Hermitian Hamiltonians, have been a subject of intense research recently. In classical optical systems, the effect of exceptional-point degeneracies on their dynamics has been observed through remarkable phenomena such as the parity-time (PT) symmetry breaking transition, asymmetric mode switching, and optimal energy transfer. After a brief history of the field of PT-symmetry, started by Carl Bender and co-workers, I will discuss quantum realizations of such systems with single photons, ultracold atoms, and superconducting transmon circuits. Results include observation of PT transitions at vanishingly small non-Hermiticity in the Floquet domain, information flow in a PT-symmetric system, and a quantum signature of the exceptional point in the qubit relaxation state. I will argue that non-Hermiticity provides a new dimension for exploring quantum systems. * Work in collaboration with Dr. Anthony Laing (University of Bristol), Prof. Le Luo (Sun Yat-Sen University), and Prof. Kater Murch (Washington U.).
Host: Saffman
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Cosmology Journal Club
Time: 12:00 pm
Place: 5242 Chamberlin Hall
Abstract: Please visit the following link for more details:
http://cmb.physics.wisc.edu/journal/index.html
Feel free to bring your lunch!
If you have questions or comments about this journal club, would like to propose a topic or volunteer to introduce a paper, please email Ross Cawthon (cawthon@wisc.edu) and Santanu Das (sdas33@wisc.edu).
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Astronomy Colloquium
"Tracing the chemical origins of exoplanetary worlds"
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 4421 Sterling Hall, Coffee and cookies 3:30 PM, Talk begins 3:45 PM
Speaker: Ke (Coco) Zhang, University of Michigan
Abstract: We have learned that exoplanets are not only common in the Galaxy but also incredibly diverse, ranging from large to small, from rocky to hydrogen gas-rich. These discoveries raise many questions about planet formation, evolution, and habitability. To address these questions, a wealth of information can be learned from making connections between the chemical compositions of raw materials in natal planet-forming disks to compositions of exoplanet atmospheres. For this talk, I will focus on making connections through two abundant elements -- carbon and oxygen-- from young disks to exoplanets. I will discuss current observations and theoretical studies on how these elemental abundances vary with location and time at planet-forming scales. I will also discuss recent discoveries of AU-scale substructures in ALMA observations of disks and place these results in the context of our growing understanding of the chemistry and physics associated with planet formation. I will conclude with a discussion of the fantastic future using ALMA and, eventually JWST, that will zoom in to characterize the chemical/physical properties of the planet-forming zone and characterize the habitable zone in disks surround M dwarfs.
Host: Professor Snezana Stanimirovic
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Friday, February 15th, 2019

Physics Department Colloquium
Atomic clocks as quantum sensors
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Andrei Derevianko, University of Nevada
Abstract: Atomic clocks are arguably the most accurate scientific instruments ever built. Modern clocks are astonishing timepieces guaranteed to keep time within a second over the age of the Universe. I will review the remarkable progress in atomic timekeeping and discuss a variety of applications of atomic clocks as quantum sensors. These applications range from measuring electric fields and geoids to dark matter and exotic physics searches. Massive entanglement of atomic ensembles offers an intriguing potential for improving the sensitivity even further. I will present our proposal on entangling millions of atoms with Rydberg gates.
Host: Mark Saffman
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Saturday, February 16th, 2019

Physics Fair
Physics Fair
Time: 11:00 am
Place: Chamberlin Hall Lobby
Speaker: Physics Department Faculty, Staff, and Students
Abstract: The 12th Annual Physics Fair will be happening Saturday, February 16 11 am - 4 pm in the lobby of Chamberlin Hall.

The Physics Fair is the annual Department of Physics open house that typically includes laboratory tours, hands-on demonstrations, activities for kids and families, and informal conversations with scientists.
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Wonders of Physics
Physics of the Periodic Table
Time: 1:00 pm
Place: 2103 Chamberlin
Speaker: Clint Sprott and others, UW Department of Physics
Abstract: This 36th annual fun-filled presentation of dramatic physics demonstrations is aimed at families and individuals. Free tickets are available from http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/tickets.htm
Host: Clint Sprott
Add this event to your calendar

Wonders of Physics
Physics of the Periodic Table
Time: 4:00 pm
Place: 2103 Chamberlin
Speaker: Clint Sprott and others, UW Department of Physics
Abstract: This 36th annual fun-filled presentation of dramatic physics demonstrations is aimed at families and individuals. Free tickets are available from http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/tickets.htm
Host: Clint Sprott
Add this event to your calendar

Wonders of Physics
Physics of the Periodic Table
Time: 7:00 pm
Place: 2103 Chamberlin
Speaker: Clint Sprott and others, UW Department of Physics
Abstract: This 36th annual fun-filled presentation of dramatic physics demonstrations is aimed at families and individuals. Free tickets are available from http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/tickets.htm
Add this event to your calendar

Sunday, February 17th, 2019

Wonders of Physics
Physics of the Periodic Table
Time: 1:00 pm
Place: 2103 Chamberlin
Speaker: Clint Sprott and others, UW Department of Physics
Abstract: This 36th annual fun-filled presentation of dramatic physics demonstrations is aimed at families and individuals. Free tickets are available from http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/tickets.htm
Add this event to your calendar

Wonders of Physics
Physics of the Periodic Table
Time: 4:00 pm
Place: 2103 Chamberlin
Speaker: Clint Sprott and others, UW Department of Physics
Abstract: This 36th annual fun-filled presentation of dramatic physics demonstrations is aimed at families and individuals. Free tickets are available from http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/tickets.htm
Add this event to your calendar

Wonders of Physics
Physics of the Periodic Table
Time: 7:00 pm
Place: 2103 Chamberlin
Speaker: Clint Sprott and others, UW Department of Physics
Abstract: This 36th annual fun-filled presentation of dramatic physics demonstrations is aimed at families and individuals. Free tickets are available from http://sprott.physics.wisc.edu/tickets.htm
Host: Clint Sprott
Add this event to your calendar

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