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This Week at Physics

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Events During the Week of August 21st through August 28th, 2016

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

No events scheduled

Tuesday, August 23rd, 2016

No events scheduled

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

High Energy Seminar
Multi-Boson Interactions
Time: 8:30 am
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: https://wp.physics.wisc.edu/mbi2016/, various
Abstract: The conference brings theorist and experimentalists together to discuss the multi-boson interactions within the contexts of the gauge sector of the standard model and new physics.
Host: Matt Herndon
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Thursday, August 25th, 2016

High Energy Seminar
Multi-Boson Interactions
Time: 8:30 am
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: https://wp.physics.wisc.edu/mbi2016/, various
Abstract: The conference brings theorist and experimentalists together to discuss the multi-boson interactions within the contexts of the gauge sector of the standard model and new physics.
Host: Matt Herndon
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NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum
High-energy astrophysical neutrinos: testing ground for new physics
Time: 2:30 pm
Place: 5280 Chamberlin hall
Speaker: Mauricio Bustamante, Center for Cosmology and AstroParticle Physics (CCAPP), The Ohio State University
Abstract: High-energy astrophysical neutrinos, recently discovered by IceCube, are fertile ground to test for the presence of new physics. We can look for it at previously unexplored energies -- from tens of TeV to a few PeV, far beyond the reach of laboratory experiments. Due to cosmological-scale baselines -- Mpc to Gpc -- tiny new-physics effects, otherwise unobservable, could, by accumulation, become detectable. These include neutrino decay, violation of fundamental symmetries, and novel neutrino-neutrino interactions. I will show that the spectral features and flavor composition of neutrinos can reveal the presence and type of new physics. I will give special attention to neutrino decay. Present-day data are already sensitive to some models. More statistics, improvements in detection techniques, and detector upgrades will only enhance the sensitivity.
Host: Carlos Arguelles
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Friday, August 26th, 2016

High Energy Seminar
Multi-Boson Interactions
Time: 8:30 am
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: https://wp.physics.wisc.edu/mbi2016/, various
Abstract: The conference brings theorist and experimentalists together to discuss the multi-boson interactions within the contexts of the gauge sector of the standard model and new physics.
Host: Matt Herndon
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R. G. Herb Condensed Matter Seminar
Atomic and nanoscale donor devices in silicon: Progress towards fabrication and characterisation
Time: 10:00 am
Place: 5310 Chamberlin
Speaker: Dr. Neil Curson , University College London
Abstract: Donors in silicon are seen as good candidates for quantum information processing (QIP) applications due to the long spin lifetimes of their valance electrons and nuclei. I will report on our progress towards fabrication and characterisation of atomic and nanoscale devices based on donors in silicon. We have identified the precise atomic positions of buried neutral arsenic (As) donors below a hydrogen-passivated silicon surface using a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) studies [1,2]. We have also used scanning microwave microscopy (SMM) to image and electronically characterize patterned phosphorus nanostructures fabricated via scanning tunneling microscope-based lithography. The SMM measurements, which are completely non-destructive and sensitive to as few as 7000 sub-surface P atoms, yield electrical and geometric properties in agreement with those obtained from electrical transport and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) for un-patterned phosphorus δ-layers. The ability to determine depth and electrical characteristics of buried P nanostructures leads the way towards 3D imaging of nanoscale electrical devices.



[1] K. Sinthiptharakoon et al., J. Phys. Condens. Matter. 26, 012001 (2014).

[2] V. Brazdova et al., arXiv:1512.04377
Host: Eriksson
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