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This Week at Physics

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Events on Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

Department Meeting
**CANCELLED**
Department Meeting
Time: 12:15 pm
Place: 5310 Chamberlin hall
Speaker: Albrecht Karle
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NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum
Multi-Messenger Astronomy with Neutrinos
Time: 2:30 pm
Place: 5280 Chamberlin Hall (coffee)
Speaker: Anna Franckowiak, DESY, Germany
Abstract: The recent discovery of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos has opened a new window to the Universe. However, the sources of those neutrinos are still unknown. Among the plausible candidates are active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts and supernovae. Combining neutrino data with electromagnetic measurements in a multi-messenger approach will increase the sensitivity to identify the neutrino sources and help to solve long-standing problems in astrophysics such as the origin of cosmic rays.

I will review the recent progress in multi-messenger astronomy using neutrino data.
Host: Albrecht Karle
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PUBLIC BAUTZ LECTURE AT WID BY EVA GREBEL
Galactic Archeology
Time: 5:00 pm
Place: Hector Deluca Forum Room, Wisconsin Institutes for Discovery
Speaker: Eva Grebel, University of Heidelberg
Abstract: How did galaxies in the universe evolve with cosmic time? Astronomers address this issue in part by observing the faint light from distant, young galaxies and in part by exploring the details preserved by stars of different ages in nearby galaxies. Professor Grebel will take us on a cosmic journey that reveals a continuously changing universe where galaxies are not viewed as isolated "island universe" but rather as gregarious systems that evolve through interactions with their neighbors. Even our own Milky Way has cannibalized some of its smaller companions, and in the distant future our Galaxy will collide with the closest neighboring spiral, the Andromeda galaxy.
Host: Astronomy department Pat Bautz Lecturer
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