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Physics Department Colloquia

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Events During the Week of April 15th through April 22nd, 2018

Monday, April 16th, 2018

No events scheduled

Tuesday, April 17th, 2018

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Wednesday, April 18th, 2018

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Thursday, April 19th, 2018

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Friday, April 20th, 2018

The astrophysical r-process: what we are learning from gravitational waves, dwarf galaxies, and stellar archaeology
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Ian Roederer, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
Abstract: Understanding the origin of the elements is one of the major challenges of modern astrophysics. The rapid neutron-capture process, or r-process, is one of the fundamental ways that stars produce the elements listed along the bottom two-thirds of the periodic table, but key aspects of the r-process are still poorly understood. I will describe three major advances in the last few years that have succeeded in confirming neutron star mergers as an important site of the r-process. These include the detection of freshly produced r-process material powering the kilonova associated with the merger of neutron stars detected via gravitational waves (GW170817), the detection of a dwarf galaxy where most of the stars are highly enhanced in r-process elements (Reticulum II), and advances in deriving abundances of previously-undetected r-process elements (Se, Te, Pt) in ultraviolet and optical spectra of metal-poor stars in the Milky Way halo field. I will describe future prospects that connect these three research directions and future rare isotope accelerators to associate specific physics with specific sites of the r-process. Finally, I will highlight the major impact of Jim Lawler's atomic spectroscopy group at Wisconsin in enabling these advances.
Host: Jim Lawler
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