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Events at Physics

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Events During the Week of March 19th through March 26th, 2023

Sunday, March 19th, 2023

Academic Calendar
Spring recess
Abstract: *Note: actual end time may vary.* URL:
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Monday, March 20th, 2023

No events scheduled

Tuesday, March 21st, 2023

No events scheduled

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2023

Department Meeting
Time: 12:15 pm
Place: B343 Sterling Hall
Speaker: Mark Eriksson, UW-Madison
Host: Mark Eriksson
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Theory Seminar (High Energy/Cosmology)
Title to be announced
Time: 1:00 pm
Place: Chamberlin 5280
Host: George Wojcik
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Thursday, March 23rd, 2023

NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum
Status of the joint NoVA-T2K analysis
Time: 2:30 pm
Speaker: Zoya Vallari, Caltech
Abstract: tba
Host: Tianlu Yuan
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Friday, March 24th, 2023

Physics Department Colloquium
The Theory of Three-Dimensional Core-Collapse Supernova Explosions
Time: 2:00 pm
Place: 2241 Chamberlin Hall
Speaker: Adam Burrows, Princeton University
Abstract: Using our code Fornax we have simulated the collapse and explosion of the
cores of many massive-star models in three spatial dimensions. This is the
most comprehensive set of realistic 3D core-collapse supernova (CCSN)
simulations yet performed and has provided very important insights into
the mechanism and character of this 60-year-old astrophysical puzzle. Most
3D models explode naturally and without artifice by the neutrino
mechanism, aided by turbulent convection. I will present detailed results
from this suite of runs and the novel conclusions derived from our new
capacity to simulate many 3D, as opposed to 2D and 1D, full physics models
every year. Emerging are insights into the criteria for explosion, the
systematics of explosion energy and residual neutron-star mass with
progenitor, the characteristics of proto-neutron star convection, neutrino
and gravitational-wave emissions and signatures, the morphology of CCSN
explosions, and supernova nucleosynthesis. This new capability, enabled
by this new algorithm and modern HPC assets, is poised to transform our
understanding of this central astrophysical phenomenon.
Host: Baha Balantekin
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