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Events at Physics

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Events on Thursday, December 10th, 2020

Academic Calendar
Last day of instruction
Time: 12:00 am
Place:
Abstract: *Note: actual end time may vary.*
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Academic Calendar
All classes move to virtual format for the remainder of the semester
Time: 12:00 am
Place:
Abstract: *Note: actual end time may vary.*
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Cosmology Journal Club
Time: 12:00 pm
Place:
Abstract: Cosmology Journal Club is back! We will be having virtual meetings this semester.

Each week, we start with a couple scheduled 15 minute talks about one's research, or an arXiv paper. The last 30 minutes will typically be open to the group for anyone to discuss an arXiv paper.

All are welcome and all fields of cosmology are appropriate.

Contact Ross Cawthon, cawthon@wisc, for more information.
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NPAC (Nuclear/Particle/Astro/Cosmo) Forum
Muon Collider Explorations
Time: 1:00 pm
Place:
Speaker: Sarah Demers, Vladimir Shiltsev, Tao Han, Simone Pagan Griso, US HEP Community
Abstract: Workshop
Host: Sridhara Dasu
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Astronomy Colloquium
Multi-messenger Astrophysics: Probing Compact Objects with Cosmic Particles
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: Zoom meeting(see Abstract ) Coffee and tea 3:30pm, Talk 3:45 PM
Speaker: Ke Fang, UW Astronomy Department
Abstract: The study of compact objects such as black holes and neutron stars is an important component of modern astrophysics. Recent detections of astrophysical neutrinos, gamma-rays, ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, and gravitational waves open up opportunities to study compact objects with multi-messengers. In this talk, we first review the latest progress in Astroparticle Physics, including some surprising puzzles revealed by new observations. We demonstrate that the key to Multi-messenger Astrophysics is to understand and establish the link between the messengers. We then illustrate how to reach this goal from both theoretical and observational perspectives. From the theoretical side, we show that high-energy particle propagation in the vicinity of compact objects may play an important role in connecting multi-wavelength observation and source physics. From the observational side, we investigate analysis frameworks aiming to exploit data across multiple wavelengths and messengers.

Zoom URL:
Meeting ID: 885 1389 6776
Passcode: 713070
Host: Professor Ellen Zweibel
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