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Events at Physics

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Events on Tuesday, November 17th, 2020

Wisconsin Quantum Institute
HQAN kickoff meeting
Time: 2:00 pm
Place: virtual; please email Sarah (saperdue@wisc.edu) for log-in info and agenda
Speaker: various, HQAN
Abstract: Help kick off the new NSF Quantum Leap Challenge Institute, HQAN! We have lined up some exciting talks from leadership at our universities, the NSF, Saikat Guha, and Mark Tolbert on the first day. On the second day, we will focus on our partners and hear about their interests in collaboration.
Host: HQAN
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PGSC Seminar
Time: 2:30 pm
Place: https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/93446409919
Speaker: Adam Frees, Matthew Beck, Jonathan Koliner, Dan Minette, Chris Greiveldinger, https://uwmadison.zoom.us/j/93446409919
Abstract: How to Go from Physics to Industry
A panel of recent UW-Madison Physics alumni will answer all your questions about deciding if industry is the right path for you. We’ll also discuss tips and tricks for landing an industry job. Bring your questions and the panel will share their experiences!

If you would like to submit an anonymous question for the panel to answer, you can use this Google Form: https://forms.gle/zW8qs1ssMSeJAnhS6
Host: Rob Morgan, graduate student
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Network in Neutrinos, Nuclear Astrophysics, and Symmetries (N3AS) Seminar
Dark Matter: A Cosmological Perspective
Time: 3:30 pm
Place: https://berkeley.zoom.us/j/91922781599
Speaker: Katie Mack , North Carolina State University
Abstract: While it is considered to be one of the most promising hints of new physics beyond the Standard Model, dark matter is as-yet known only through its gravitational influence on astronomical and cosmological observables. I will discuss our current best evidence for dark matter's existence as well as the constraints that astrophysical probes can place on its properties, while highlighting some tantalizing anomalies that could indicate non-gravitational dark matter interactions. Future observations, along with synergies between astrophysical and experimental searches, have the potential to illuminate dark matter's fundamental nature and its influence on the evolution of matter in the cosmos from the first stars and galaxies to today.
Host: Baha Balantekin
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