Massive halo finally explains stream of gas swirling around the Milky Way

a starscape showing the milky way in the distance and a rendering of the gases surrounding the large magellenic cloud
a starscape showing the milky way in the distance and a rendering of the gases surrounding the large magellenic cloud
The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds as they would appear if the gas around them was visible to the naked eye. | Credits: Scott Lucchini (simulation), Colin Legg (background)

The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. They are surrounded by a high-velocity gaseous structure called the Magellanic Stream, which consists of gas stripped from both clouds. So far, simulations have been unable to reconcile observations with a complete picture of how the stream was formed. In this Nature week’s issue, numerical simulations carried out at by Scott Lucchini, graduate student at the Physics Department working with Elena D’Onghia, present a model that potentially resolves this conundrum. By embedding the Large Magellanic Cloud in a corona of ionized gas, the researchers were able to simulate the Magellanic Stream accurately and explain its structure. Ellen Zweibel and Chad Bustard are also co-authors of the article.

Read the full UW news story | Read the Nature article

 

WQI team named winners in international quantum research competition

a blue-laser-hued image of a trapped ball of strontium ions in an optical lattice clock

A WQI faculty team was one of 18 winners in the Innovare Advancement Center’s “Million Dollar International Quantum U Tech Accelerator” competition, which awarded a total of $1.35 million last week. The winning teams, including UW­–Madison physics professors Shimon Kolkowitz and Mark Saffman, each earned $75,000 toward their proposed research.

The competition attracted nearly 250 proposals from teams across the world in the areas of quantum timing, sensing, computing and communications, and 36 teams were invited to present at the live virtual event.

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Prof. Brian Rebel promoted to Senior Scientist at Fermilab

Brian Rebel

Yesterday, Fermilab promoted Prof. Brian Rebel to Senior Scientist. He has a joint appointment there, and his new title at Fermilab is the closest equivalent to full professor for which scientific staff are eligible. Congrats, Brian!